The Modern Part of an Universal History: From the Earliest Account of Time. Compiled from Original Writers. By the Authors of The Antient Part

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S. Richardson, T. Osborne, C. Hitch, A. Millar, John Rivington, S. Crowder, P. Davey and B. Law, T. Longman, and C. Ware, 1760
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Page 297 - Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona ; for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven. And I say also unto thee, that thou art Peter, and upon this rock will I build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
Page 257 - I believe in the Holy Ghost, The Lord, The Giver of life, Who proceedeth from the Father and the Son, Who with the Father and the Son together is worshipped and glorified, Who spake by the Prophets.
Page 35 - Its length is computed to be about '•*"> *" 60 leagues, and its breadth 20, but was formerly much more '*"*'• efctenfive, feveral of its provinces having been difmembered from it, and joined to that of Tigre. A great part of it is very mountainous and rocky, efpecially towards the eaft, which is moftly inhabited by thofe wild nations mentioned in the laft note. Some towns, tho...
Page 257 - This is the day which the LORD hath made ; Let us rejoice and be glad in it...
Page 256 - We believe in one God, and in his only Son, Jesus Christ, who is his Word and his Power, his Counsel and his Wisdom ; who was with him before the world was created. But in the last days he came to us, — not, however, that he might leave the throne of his divinity, — and was made man of the Holy Ghost and of the holy Virgin Mary, and was baptized...
Page 78 - Divorces •why fa frequent. flaw obtained. even the title of facrament; in confequence of which they think it unlawful for a man to have more than one wife at once. Neither do they allow any to be lawful, unlefs the perfons have been joined by a prieft : and yet there are numbers of them that have a plurality of wives, and live with them unmolefled.
Page 396 - Cam'. and other parts ; and thofe who cannot purchafe them, make ufe of potatoes in their ftead, which are here fine, large, and in great plenty. They likewife abound with great variety of fruit-trees, roots, plants and other efculents, and with melons of exquifite tafte. The country is covered with citron-trees, with whofe odoriferous fmell the air is agreeably perfumed almoft all the year.
Page 384 - Camboy, and other parts; whence their merchants bring cotton, filk, and other cloths, fpices, and variety of ^drugs, which they exchange with the inhabitants for gold, ivory, wax, and other commodities. It is chiefly inhabited by Mohammedans, who came and fettled there in the time of the khalifs. The...
Page 509 - ... with hardnefs of heart ; who, according to another tradition which prevails, and is carefully preferved throughout the different nations, were fent by God himfelf, and came into their country through a window ; that the man's name was Noh, and the -woman's Hingnoh, who taught their defendants to do many things, and keep cattle.
Page 58 - They root up large tress, and break fmall ones, to feed on their leaves; by which, in time, they deftroy whole forefts, as they commonly go in large droves, from fifty to a hundred, or more. The food they...

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