History of Bishnupur-Raj: An Ancient Kingdom of West Bengal

Front Cover
Calcutta, 1921 - Bishnupur (India : Kingdom) - 148 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 117 - The traveller, either with or without merchandise, becomes the immediate care of the government, which allots him guards, without any expense, to conduct him from stage to stage ; and these are accountable for the safety and accommodation of his person and effects. At the end of the first stage he is...
Page 117 - If anything is lost in this district, for instance, a bag of money or other valuables, the person who finds it hangs it upon the next tree, and gives notice to the nearest chowkey, or place of guard, the officer of which orders immediate publication of the same by beat of tomtom, or drum.
Page 47 - Bankurd were united into one District, a considerable armed force being maintained to repress the bands of plunderers on the western frontier. On one occasion, in 1788, the Collector had to call out the troops against a band of marauders five hundred strong, who had made a descent on a market town within two hours' ride of the English station, and murdered or frightened away the inhabitants of between thirty and forty villages.
Page 117 - ... and accommodation of his person and effects. At the end of the first stage he is delivered over, with certain benevolent formalities, to the guards of the next, who, after interrogating the traveller as to the usage he had received in his journey dismiss the first guard with a written certificate of their behaviour, and a receipt for the traveller and his effects; which certificate and receipt are returnable to the commanding officer of the first stagy, who registers the sine, and regularly reports...
Page 60 - Sacking villages and towns of the surrounding tracts, and engaging in slaughters and captures, they set fire to granaries, and spared no vestige of fertility. And when the stores and granaries of Bardwan were exhausted, and the supply of imported grains was also completely cut off, to avert death by starvation, human beings ate plantain-roots, whilst animals were fed on the leaves of trees. Even these gradually ceased to be available. For breakfasts and suppers, nothing except the discs of the sun...
Page 60 - Sacking the villages and towns of the surrounding tracts, and engaging in slaughter and captures, they set fire to granaries and spared no vestige of fertility. And when the stores and granaries of Burdwan were exhausted, and the supply of imported grains was also completely cut off, to avert death by starvation, human beings ate plantain roots, whilst animals were fed on the leaves of trees.
Page viii - And it is to this Dravidian ethnic type of India that the ancient Sumerian bears most resemblance, so far as we can judge from his monuments. He was very like a Southern Hindu of the Dekkan (who still speaks Dravidian languages).
Page 58 - Khan's Government, who sent a strong body of horse to reduce him, these he suffered to advance far into his country, then opening the dams of the rivers...
Page 115 - This beneficence to strangers is the consequence of the warmth with which the citizens enter into each others's interests. They are so far from being guilty of an injury to each other, that whoever finds a purse, or other thing of value, hangs it upon the first tree he meets with, and informs the nearest guard, who gives notice of it to the public by beat of drum.
Page 115 - ... of the ftate, is laid out in improvements. The Raja is enabled to engage in thefe humane employments as he pays the Moguls only what tribute, and at what times, he thinks proper.

Bibliographic information