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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper,* void of all characters,....
" Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper,* void of all characters, without any ideas; how comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless... "
The Foundations of Normal and Abnormal Psychology - Page 124
by Boris Sidis - 1914 - 406 pages
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An essay concerning human understanding; with Thoughts on the conduct of the ...

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1801
...experience. 2. All Ideas come from Senfation or Reftection, LET us then fuppofe the mind to be, as we fay, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas, how comes it to be furnifhed ? Whence comes it by that vaft ftore which the bufy and boundlefs fancy of man has painted...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of ...

John Locke - 1801 - 308 pages
... 2. All Ideas came from Setifation or Reflection. LET us then fuppofe the mind to be, as we fay, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas, how comes it to be furnifhed ! Whettce comes it by that vaft ftore which the bufy and boundlefs fancy of man has painted...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1

John Locke - Books and reading - 1806
..., $ 2. All Ideas come from Senfation or RefiecJion. LET us then fuppofe the mine! to be, as we fay, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas ; how comes it to be rurnifhed ? Whence comes it by that vaft ftore which the bufy and boundlefs fancy of man has painted...
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Philosophical Essays

Dugald Stewart - Psychology - 1811 - 580 pages
...so, I shall endeavour to explain as clearly and concisely as I can. " Let us suppose" (says Locke) " the mind to be, as -' we say, white paper, void of...without any -' ideas: How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes -' it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fan" cy of man has painted on it,...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1813
...shall appeal to every one's own observation and experience. 2. All ideas come from sensation or reflection. LET us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white pdper, void of all characters, without any ideas ; how comes it to be furnished ? Whence comes it by...
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An essay concerning human understanding. Also extr. from the author's works ...

John Locke - 1815
...shall appeal to every one's own observation and experience. 2. All ideas come from sensation or reflection. Let us then suppose the mind to be, as...characters, without any ideas; how comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with...
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Philosophical Essays

Dugald Stewart - Philosophy - 1816 - 615 pages
...so, I shall endeavour to explain as clearly and concisely as I can. " Let us suppose," says Locke, " the mind to be, " as we say, white paper, void of...characters, '* without any ideas : How comes it to be furnish" ed ? Whence comes it by that vast store which " the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted...
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An essay concerning human understanding

John Locke - 1823
...one's own observation and experience. . 2. All ideas come from sensation or reflection. — Let ns then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper,...characters, without any ideas ; how comes it to be furnished ? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with...
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An essay concerning human understanding

John Locke - 1825
...shall appeal to every one's own observation and experience. 2. All ideas come from sensation or reflection. — Le-t us then suppose the mind to be,...characters, without any ideas; how comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it, with...
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Essay on instinct, and its physical and moral relations

Thomas Hancock - 1824
...that concern him — and may arrive at certainty without any such original notions or principles."* " Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white...characters, without any ideas ; how comes it to be furnished .' Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge ? To this, I answer, in one word, from Experience...
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