The Translator: A Tribesman's Memoir of Darfur

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Mar 18, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 224 pages
I am the translator who has taken journalists into dangerous Darfur. It is my intention now to take you there in this book, if you have the courage to come with me.

The young life of Daoud Hari–his friends call him David–has been one of bravery and mesmerizing adventure. He is a living witness to the brutal genocide under way in Darfur.

The Translator is a suspenseful, harrowing, and deeply moving memoir of how one person has made a difference in the world–an on-the-ground account of one of the biggest stories of our time. Using his high school knowledge of languages as his weapon–while others around him were taking up arms–Daoud Hari has helped inform the world about Darfur.

Hari, a Zaghawa tribesman, grew up in a village in the Darfur region of Sudan. As a child he saw colorful weddings, raced his camels across the desert, and played games in the moonlight after his work was done. In 2003, this traditional life was shattered when helicopter gunships appeared over Darfur’s villages, followed by Sudanese-government-backed militia groups attacking on horseback, raping and murdering citizens and burning villages. Ancient hatreds and greed for natural resources had collided, and the conflagration spread.

Though Hari’s village was attacked and destroyedhis family decimated and dispersed, he himself escaped. Roaming the battlefield deserts on camels, he and a group of his friends helped survivors find food, water, and the way to safety. When international aid groups and reporters arrived, Hari offered his services as a translator and guide. In doing so, he risked his life again and again, for the government of Sudan had outlawed journalists in the region, and death was the punishment for those who aided the “foreign spies.” And then, inevitably, his luck ran out and he was captured. . . .

The Translator tells the remarkable story of a man who came face-to-face with genocide– time and again risking his own life to fight injustice and save his people.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Marlene-NL - LibraryThing

I do not know why it was so hard for me to get into this book. I had to try 3 times and the thied time I finally managed to fully read it. Great story teller. Learned more about Dafur. An interesting read Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - labfs39 - LibraryThing

Daoud Hari is a Zaghawa tribesman born in a village in Darfur, who, at an early age, showed an aptitude for languages. As an adult he lived abroad for a while, but was remanded to Sudan after ... Read full review

Contents

We Are Here
11
The Dead Nile
21
A Bad Time to Go Home
28
1Iy Sisters Village
38
Homecoming
48
The Seven of Us
62
The Translator
68
Two and a Half Million Stories
77
What Can Change in Twentyfour Hours?
120
Some Boys Up Ahead with a Kalashnikov
125
Our Bad Situation Gets a Little Worse
131
Blindfolds Please
136
We Came to Rescue You Guys 112
142
We C ant Think of Anything to Say 116
151
Open House at the Torture Center
161
The Hawalya
168

Connections
92
Once More Home
99
Waking Up i11 NDj amena
106
A Strange Forest
111
The Sixth Trip
114
My One Percent Chance
176
Acknowledgments 183
181
A Darfur Primer
185
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
195
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Daoud Hari was born in the Darfur region of Sudan. After escaping an attack on his village, he entered the refugee camps in Chad and began serving as a translator for major news organizations including The New York Times, NBC, and the BBC, as well as the United Nations and other aid groups. He now lives in the United States and was part of SaveDarfur.org's Voices from Darfur tour.

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