A practical German grammar

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M. DuMont-Schuberg, 1865 - German language - 354 pages
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Page 281 - I cried with vexation ; and the reflection gave me more chagrin than the whistle gave me pleasure. This, however, was afterwards of use to me, the impression continuing on my mind ; so that often, when I was tempted to buy some unnecessary thing, I said to myself, Don't give too much for the whistle ; and so I saved my money.
Page 281 - I then came home, and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my whistle, but disturbing all the family. My brothers, and sisters; and cousins, understanding the bargain I had made, told me I had given four times as much for it as it was worth.
Page 281 - When I saw another fond of popularity, constantly employing himself in political bustles, neglecting his own affairs, and ruining them by that neglect, He pays, indeed, said I, too much for his whistle.
Page 281 - When I saw one too ambitious of court favor, sacrificing his time in attendance on levees, his repose, his liberty, his virtue, and perhaps his friends, to attain it, I have said to myself, This man gives too much for his whistle.
Page 280 - I do not pretend to give such a sum ; I only lend it to you. When you shall return to your country with a good character, you cannot fail of getting into some business that will in time enable you to pay all your debts. In that case, when you meet with another honest man in similar distress, you must pay me by lending this sum to him ; enjoining him to discharge the debt by a like operation when he shall be able, and shall meet with such another opportunity. I hope it may thus go through many hands...
Page 281 - I, you are providing pain for yourself instead of pleasure; you give too much for your whistle.
Page 281 - I might have bought with the rest of the money ; and laughed at me so much for my folly, that I cried with vexation ; and the reflection gave me more chagrin than the whistle gave me pleasure. This however was...
Page 282 - When I see a beautiful, sweet-tempered girl, married to an ill-natured brute of a husband ; What a pity it is, says I, that she has paid so much for a whistle. In short, I conceived that great p'art of the miseries of mankind were brought upon them by the false estimates they had made of the value of things, and by their giving too much for their whistles.
Page 281 - If I knew a miser, who gave up every kind of comfortable living, all the pleasure of doing good to others, all the esteem of his fellow-citizens, and the joys of benevolent friendship, for the sake of accumulating wealth, Poor man, said I, you pay too much for your whistle.
Page 280 - When I was a child of seven years old my friends on a holiday filled my pocket with coppers. I went directly to a shop where they sold toys for children, and being charmed with the sound of a whistle that I met by the way in the hands of another boy, I voluntarily offered and gave all my money for one.

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