Giants of Delft: Johannes Vermeer and the Natural Philosophers : the Parallel Search for Knowledge During the Age of Discovery

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Bucknell University Press, 2003 - Art - 156 pages
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"In a widely researched and deeply considered book, Huerta argues that Vermeer's use of the camera obscura and other instrumental adjuncts parallels van Leeuwenhoek's pursuit of the "optical way," and embodies a profound philosophical connection between these investigators. Analyzing Vermeer's work, Huerta shows that the artist's choices were the result of his personal response to contemporary scientific discoveries, and the work of men such as van Leeuwenhoek, Christiaan Huygens, and Galileo Galilei. Furthermore, Huerta compares Vermeer's program of informed observation to the methods used by van Leeuwenhoek and other scientists to accumulate and analyze instrument-mediated knowledge. This approach enabled Vermeer to confront the same issues as natural philosophers regarding the interpretation of unfamiliar images presented by instrumental systems."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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Contents

List of Illustrations
9
Introduction
15
Leeuwenhoek Galileo van Eyck and Vermeer
30
Galileo Huygens Leeuwenhoek and Vermeer
54
Leeuwenhoek Galileo Hooke and Vermeer
72
Vermeer and Mapping
90
Vermeer Raphael and Huygens
102
Conclusion
120
References
145
Index
151
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Robert Huerta is working as an independent historian, focusing on the early modern period.

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