Know Your Own Ship: A Simple Explanation of the Stability, Trim, Construction, Tonnage and Freeboard of Ships, Together with a Fully Worked Out Set of the Usual Ship Calculations (from Drawings) : Specially Arranged for the Use of Ships' Officers, Superintendents, Engineers, Draughtsmen, and Others

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C. Griffin, 1899 - Naval architecture - 336 pages
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Page 240 - Act to contain available for the proper accommodation of the men who are to occupy it, and shall be securely constructed, properly lighted and ventilated, properly protected from weather and sea, and, as far as practicable, properly shut off and protected from effluvium which may be caused by cargo or bilge water.
Page 249 - Freeboard denotes the height of the side of a ship above the waterline at the middle of her length, measured from the top of the deck at the side...
Page 260 - Atlantic, when sailing to, or from, the Mediterranean, or any British or European port, and which may sail to, or from, or call at, ports in British North America...
Page 76 - Molded Depth. The extreme height of a vessel amidships, from the top of the keel to the top of the upper deck beam.
Page 208 - ... have entered into a compartment in the middle of o the length, and thus to have increased the draught uniformly all fore and aft. However, where a compartment is damaged at or near the ends of the vessel, not only may there be tendency to transverse inclination, but longitudinal also. Thus in fig. 122 let G be the centre of gravity and B the centre of buoyancy in the intact condition. Should the vessel be now damaged through collision in the fore compartment, CD, and the sea find free entrance,...
Page 253 - Also in vessels where r'ff, or more, of the main deck is covered by substantial erections, the freeboard found from the tables should be measured amidships from a wood deck, whether the deck be of wood or iron. In applying this principle to vessels having shorter lengths of substantial enclosed erections the reduction in freeboard, in consideration of its being measured from the iron deck, is to be regulated in proportion to the length of the deck covered by such erections. Thus in a vessel having...
Page 63 - ... of the keel to the upper deck stringer plate. By referring to the tables in Lloyd's Rules, the sizes of these parts of the structure, corresponding to the sum of these dimensions, may be found. The number for three-deck steam vessels is produced by the deduction of 7 feet from the sum of the measurements taken to the top of the upper deck beams. The sizes of all longitudinal framing — keel, keelsons, stringers, as well as thickness of outside and deck plating, stem bar, and stern frame —...
Page 120 - ... displaced, and this point is, therefore, called the Centre of Buoyancy. 21. Condition of stability of equilibrium. Let AND, Fig. 21, be the section made by a vertical plane containing G the centre of gravity and B the centre of buoyancy of a floating vessel, AD being the surface of the fluid when the centre of gravity and centre of buoyancy are in the same vertical line.
Page 116 - AXIS Now, the question may be well asked at this stage — Of what value is this result? The only answer is, that these points, by themselves, are of no practical use, and give no idea whatever of a vessel's stability, until we get the position of the centre of gravity. Let us suppose the height of the centre of gravity from the bottom of the box to be 3 feet (the box having, of course, a load in its lower part, so as to keep the centre of gravity of the loaded box down to 3 feet). Since the metacentre...
Page 274 - ... and draw ordinates through the dividing points and the extremities of the base, so that their total number, when divided by 3, gives a remainder of 1. Call the 4th, 7th, 10th, etc., ordinates, dividing ordinates; and the others, except the endmost, intermediate ordinates. Add together the endmost ordinates, twice the dividing ordinates, and three times the intermediate ordinates; multiply the sum by three-eighths of the common interval: the product will be the required area, nearly. 14. Area...

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