Annual of Scientific Discovery: Or, Year-book of Facts in Science and Art

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Gould, Kendall, and Lincoln, 1857 - Industrial arts
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Page xvi - ... other plants, adapted to the latitude and climate of the State of Maryland, and cause to be carefully noticed upon the records of said institution the character of said experiments, the kind of soil upon which they were undertaken, the system of cultivation adopted, the state of the atmosphere and...
Page 139 - It has never been resolved into simpler or elementary influences, and may perhaps best be conceived of as an axis of power having contrary forces , exactly equal in amount, in contrary directions.
Page 141 - As the luminous effects are undoubtedly owing to a vibratory movement executed by the molecules of the platinum, it seems from the foregoing considerations to follow, that the frequency of those vibrations increases with the temperature." Sir David Brewster has observed, that in the spectra produced by the electric light, the chemical rays are more numerous than in those produced by the lime light. The problem then to be solved is, — whether the chemical...
Page 303 - The first notice of casts of the cells and the soft parts of the Polythalamia was published by myself in the American Journal of Science for 1845, where I stated as follows : — > " The specimens from Fort Washington presented me with what I believe have never been before noticed, viz., distinct casts of Polythalamia. That these minute and perishable shells should, when destroyed by chemical changes, ever leave behind them indestructible memorials of their existence, was scarcely to be expected,...
Page 342 - ... whole extent by a deep unbroken sea of ice, that gathers perennial increase from the water-shed of vast snow-covered mountains, and all the precipitations of the atmosphere upon its own surface. Imagine this moving onward like a great glacial river, seeking outlets at every fiord and valley, rolling icy cataracts into the Atlantic and Greenland seas ; and, having at last reached the northern limit of the land that has borne it up, pouring out a mighty frozen torrent into unknown Arctic space.
Page 407 - LAKE SUPERIOR; Its Physical Character, Vegetation, and Animals. By L. AGASSIZ, and others. One volume, octavo, elegantly Illustrated. Cloth, $3.50.
Page 258 - ... accompanies the boil. The rapid union of carbon and oxygen which thus takes place adds still further to the temperature of the metal, while the diminished quantity of carbon present allows a part of the oxygen to combine with the iron, which undergoes combustion, and is converted into an oxide. At the excessive temperature that the metal has now acquired, the oxide, as soon as formed, undergoes fusion, and forms a powerful solvent of those earthy bases that are associated with the iron ; the...
Page 24 - ... insect in a beautiful dye producible from guano. She has shown that our supply of animal food might be obtained at a cheaper rate from the Antipodes, by simply boiling down the juices of the flesh of cattle now wasted and thrown aside in those countries, and importing the extract in a state of concentration. She has pointed out that one of the earths which constitute the principal material of our globe contains a metal, as light as glass, as malleable and ductile as copper, and as little liable...
Page 187 - ... all known vegetables get the greater part of their substance, certainly all their combustible matter, from the decomposition of carbonic acid and water, absorbed by them from the air and soil. The separation of carbon and of hydrogen from oxygen...
Page 338 - Rivers ; and that their first appearance at Fort Chipewyan was on the 25th of June, 1825. Major...

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