Musical Migrations, Volume I: Transnationalism and Cultural Hybridity in Latin/o America

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Palgrave Macmillan, Jan 4, 2003 - Music - 224 pages
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The transcultural impact of Latin American musical forms in the United States calls for a deeper understanding of the shifting cultural meanings of music. Musical Migrations examines the tensions between the value of Latin popular music as a metaphor for national identity and its transnational meanings as it traverses national borders, geocultural spaces, audiences, and historical periods. The anthology addresses the role of popular music in Caribbean diasporas in the US and Europe; the trans-Caribbean identities of Salsa and reggae; the racial, cultural, and ethnic hybridity in rock across the Americas; and the tensions between tradition and modernity in Peruvian indigenous music, mariachi music in the United States, and Trinidadian music.

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About the author (2003)

FRANCES R. APARICIO is Professor and Director of the Latin American and Latino Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Author of an award-winning book, Listening to Salsa: Gender, Latin Popular Music, and Puerto Rican Cultures (Wesleyan University Press, 1998), Professor Aparicio has done seminal work on Latino popular music, gender, and cultural identity.

CNDIDA F. JQUEZ is Assistant Professor in the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana University.

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