Frederick Douglass

Front Cover
Infobase Publishing, 2009 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 158 pages

Born a slave in Maryland, Frederick Douglass became one of the best orators and statesmen in America. He worked as a houseboy and a field hand, experiencing some of the harshest conditions of any slave. Although it was unlawful to teach slaves how to read, Douglass learned from neighborhood boys and paid them with food. Seven years after he escaped slavery and moved North, Douglass published the first of his three autobiographies, Narrative of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave. Douglass became a newspaper editor, a political activist, and a representative and spokesperson for the rights of African Americans. He believed in equal rights for all people, whether black, white, woman, man, Native American, or recent immigrant. He lived through the Civil War, the end of slavery, and the beginning of segregation.

 

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Contents

A SelfMade Man
7
I Was Born in Tuckahoe
15
How a Slave Was Made a Man
28
The Making of an Abolitionist
44
The Narrative
56
The Burnedover District
69
A Turbulent Decade
84
Recruiting for Freedom
100
The Beautiful Needful Thing
131
Chronology
137
Glossary
142
Bibliography
144
Further Resources
149
Picture Credits
151
Index
152
About the Author
158

The Cedar Hill Years
116

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About the author (2009)

Jon Sterngass, Ph.D., is a freelance writer and former visiting assistant professor at Union College. He is the author of several children's books and numerous textbook chapters. He lives in Saratoga Springs, New York.