MY BONDAGE AND MY FREEDOM.

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I would recommend this amazing book to anyone who wants to know more about slavery from the mouth of someone who lived it. AMAZING BOOK

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It is a good primary resource for students of the middle school age.

Selected pages

Contents

I
xvii
II
33
III
43
IV
51
V
61
VI
79
VII
89
VIII
107
XIV
173
XV
185
XVI
205
XVII
233
XVIII
250
XIX
271
XX
304
XXI
321

IX
119
X
129
XI
141
XII
151
XIII
163
XXII
335
XXIII
357
XXIV
365
XXV
392

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 231 - For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.
Page 196 - We declare that we are as much as ever convinced of the great evil of slavery ; therefore, no slaveholder shall be eligible to any official station in our Church hereafter ; where the laws of the state in which he lives will admit of emancipation, and permit the liberated slave to enjoy freedom.
Page 374 - Thousand dollars in hand paid by the said party of the second part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have granted, bargained, and sold, and by these presents do grant, bargain, and sell, unto the said party of the second part...
Page 445 - What to the American slave is your Fourth of July? I answer, a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim.
Page 244 - I did, come what might; that he had used me like a brute for six months, and that I was determined to be used so no longer. With that, he strove to drag me to a stick that was lying just out of the stable door. He meant to knock me down.
Page 146 - If he learns to read the Bible it will forever unfit him to be a slave. He should know nothing but the will of his master, and learn to obey it. As to himself, learning will do him no good, but a great deal of harm, making him disconsolate and unhappy. If you teach him how to read, hell want to know how to write, and this accomplished, he'll be running away with himself.
Page 181 - GONE, gone, — sold and gone, To the rice-swamp dank and lone. Where the slave-whip ceaseless swings, Where the noisome insect stings, Where the fever demon strews Poison with the falling dews, Where the sickly sunbeams glare Through the hot and misty air ; Gone, gone, — sold and gone, To the rice-swamp dank and lone, From Virginia's hills and waters ; Woe is me, my stolen daughters ! Gone, gone, — sold and gone, To the rice-swamp dank and lone.
Page 246 - A man, without force, is without the essential dignity of humanity. Human nature is so constituted, that it cannot honor a helpless man, although it can pity him; and even this it cannot do long, if the signs of power do not arise.
Page 40 - The tear down childhood's cheek that flows, Is like the dew-drop on the rose,— When next the summer breeze comes by, And waves.the bush,—the flower is dry.
Page 220 - God, save me! God, deliver me! Let me be free! Is there any God? Why am I a slave? I will run away. I will not stand it. Get caught, or get clear, I'll try it. I had as well die with ague as the fever. I have only one life to lose. I had as well be killed running as die standing.

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