Winter Camping

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Macmillan Company, 1920 - Camping - 164 pages
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Contents

I
13
II
21
III
37
IV
49
V
61
VI
73
VII
89
VIII
101
IX
121
X
133
XI
147
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Page 154 - Oooo Hooo, Oooo Hooo!" Around the bend at the top of the big sand hill sweeps the sled, horses trotting freely, driver high above with feet braced wide apart, knees bent, chanting warning to all below. The gutterman hastily spreads his last shovelful of sand in the runner track and steps aside. The ponderous load tips gently over the summit, pushes the horses to a quickening run, and sweeps irresistibly past. From down the trail comes back fainter and fainter the driver's musical cry, "Oooo Hooo,...
Page 16 - All that could be done was to go over for a few days, or a week or two, at a time, to superintend the Bible-women, leaving Miss Parslee to take care of the work in Jandiala.
Page 155 - ... as someone has said, that the pleasure of camping is in the contrasts, then here certainly it should be unalloyed. Outside the little palisade the chill breath of Jack Frost strikes to the very core of the forest and trees crack and groan as their inner fibers are torn asunder. The ice on the little ponds and lakes rives with the detonation of heavy cannonading, now on this side, now with a deeper boom from the other. Constantly twigs snap and fall with a soft thud into the snow. You step outside...
Page 14 - I have camped in winter at every available opportunity, in cabins, tents, and lean-tos, and now between black flies, midgets, and all the pests of summer and the problem of warmth in winter, I would quickly choose the latter if I could have but one.
Page 154 - ... deep into the snow. The deer are yarded over the other side of the hill and we read their hard struggle against hunger and cold. The work of the lumbermen never ceases to fascinate. The wild, reckless "bobbing" down mountain sides, where nothing but bottom can stop the precipitous plunge, whether a horse fall or a chain break, is all in the day's work. The last loads from the skidways to the landing are bound on by torchlight. Echoing down the darkening road comes a clear, bell-like call, rising...
Page 155 - ... past. From down the trail comes back fainter and fainter the driver's musical cry, "Oooo Hooo, Oooo Hooo!" You make haste to camp and a fire. If it be true, as someone has said, that the pleasure of camping is in the contrasts, then here certainly it should be unalloyed. Outside the little palisade the chill breath of Jack Frost strikes to the very core of the forest and trees crack and groan as their inner fibers are torn asunder. The ice on the little ponds and lakes rives with the detonation...
Page 7 - Some of the matter in the following pages has appeared from time to time in OUTING. It has been so thoroughly recast and added to, however, that it is practically new material. Chapter XI, on
Page 154 - ... of the partridge's wings as it avoided the spring, are clearly impressed. Here we are in Alderman Hedgehog's bailiwick, the bold, broad ruts of his comings and goings worn deep into the snow. The deer are yarded over the other side of the hill and we read their hard struggle against hunger and cold. The work of the lumbermen never ceases to fascinate. The wild, reckless "bobbing...
Page 147 - It will add much to the \varmth and coziness of the camp if spruce boughs are stuck close together around it and banked up with snow on the outside to form a palisade, thus keeping the wind out and the heat in. The pure, clean beauty of the winter woods is in itself ample reason for cold weather camping. After a snowfall the white laden branches droop heavily and the dark shadows underneath are thrown into striking contrast with the dazzling brilliance of the sun as it reflects from myriads of crystal...

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