Steam Heating for Buildings: Or Hints to Steam Fitters. Being a Description of Steam Heating Apparatus for Warming and Ventilating Private Houses and Large Buildings, with Remarks on Steam, Water, and Air, in Their Relation to Heating, to which are Added Useful Miscellaneous Tables

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J. Wiley & sons, 1881 - Steam-heating - 234 pages
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Contents

Tees in a Main
12
Stopvalves in Risers
13
Main Returnpipes
14
Dry Returnpipes
15
RADIATORS AND HEATING SURFACES PAGE 21 Vertical Tube Radiators
17
Steam Entering a Radiator
18
Castiron Radiators
20
Sheetiron Radiators
21
To Estimate Heating Surfaces for Direct Radiation
22
Isolated Buildings
24
CLASSES OF RADIATION 28 How Direct Radiating Surfaces should be Placed
26
Indirect Radiators
27
Indirect Radiator Boxes
28
Airflues
29
Change of Air in Rooms
30
Position for Indirect Heaters with the Action of Air in Rooms etc and the Cause of Cold Feet
34
BOILERS FOR HEATING ETC PAGE
36
HEATING SURFACES OF BOILERS 86 Firebox and Flues
37
Crowding the Firebox with Hanging Surfaces
38
Corrugated Fire Surfaces
39
Proportioning Boilers
40
Reverberatory or Drop Flue Boilers
41
Simplicity of Parts
42
Requirements for House Boilers
43
PAGE
44
Construction of Upright Boilers
45
Construction of Horizontal Boilers
46
Technical Names of Parts of Boilers and their Setting
47
FORMS OF BOILERS USED IN HEATING 50 A Source of Danger to the Fitter
49
Upright Multitubular Boiler
50
Upright with Steamdome
51
Upright Droptube Boiler
52
Baseburning Boiler
56
Horizontal Tubular Boilers
57
J Horizontal Multitubular Boilers
60
REMARKS ON BOILER SETTING 57 Thickness of Walls
63
Firebricks in a Furnace
65
Dead Plates
67
Relation of Boiler to Heaters
69
Grate of a House Boiler
74
Size of Grate to Boiler
75
Examples of Grates and Chimneys
76
Ta le of Grates and Chimneys
78
Why Grates Break?
80
CHAPTER X
83
Decrease of Pressure under the Valve
84
Graphic Illustration of the Size of the Opening of a 4inch Valve when Blowing off at various Pressures
85
PormulsB for Calculating the Size of Safetyvalves
86
AIRVALVES ON RADIATORS 90 Where they should be Placed
100
Expansion of Castiron 118
102
Airvalves Construction and Design
103
Waste of Water from Airvalves at High Pressure
104
CHAPTER XIV
106
Table of Standard Dimensions of Pipes
107
How to Calculate the Relative Areas of Pipes
108
Table of Relative Areas of Pipes
110
Diagram of Relative Areas of Pipes
112
Expansion of Pipes and its Relation to Steammains
113
Expansion of Returnpipes
114
Effect of Lime and Moisture on Pipes
115
Connecting Boiler Domes etc
116
Expansion of Wroughtiron
118
A Table of Linear Expansion of Wrought and Cast Iron Pipes
119
CHAPTER XV
120
Heat or Power Necessary to put Water into Boilers
122
Poor Economy to Use Small Piping
123
How to Determine the Size of the Main
124
Diagram of the Size of Mainpipes for Gravity Apparatus
125
CHAPTER XVI
128
Table of Elastic Force Temperature and Volume of Steam
130
Calculations on Steam Water etc
131
Diagram of Rankines Formula
132
CHAPTER XVII
134
Sensible and Latent Heat of Steam
136
A Diagram of Sensible and Latent Heat of Steam and Water
137
Equivalents of Heat
138
What Air Is
140
Air Necessary for an Adult
141
Expansion of Air
142
Watery Vapor in the Atmosphere
144
Drying Power of Air
145
Saving in Time by High Temperatures in the Drying Room
146
Systems
150
The Holly System
151
CHAPTER XX
159
How Hot can Feedwater be Made
160
How much of the Exhaust Steam can be used in Warming the Feedwater
161
Warming Buildings with Exhaust Steam
162
Exhaust and Live Steam in the same Coils
163
BOILING AND COOKING BY STEAM AND HINTS AS TO HOW THE APPARATUS
165
Warming Water in Tanks
176
Laundrydrying
182
BOILER CONNECTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
200
MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES
206
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

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Page 24 - Divide the difference in temperature, between that at which the room is to be kept and the coldest outside atmosphere, by the difference between the temperature of the steam pipes and that at which you wish to keep the room, and the product will be the square feet, or fraction thereof of plate or pipe surface to each square foot of glass (or its equivalent in wall surface).
Page 135 - ... latent heat of steam. When a solid becomes a liquid, or a liquid becomes a vapor, heat is absorbed, more than was necessary to raise it to the temperature of conversion, and this latent heat does work in the destruction of the force of cohesion and other occult changes which take place, and must be absorbed/rowi some other substance.
Page i - Steam Heating for Buildings; or, Hints to Steam Fitters, being a description of Steam Heating Apparatus for Warming and Ventilating Private Houses and Large Buildings, with remarks on Steam, Water, and Air in their relation to Heating.
Page 146 - CUBIC FOOT FOR VARIOUS TEMPERATURES. It will be seen by a study of the table, that the quantity of vapor per cubic foot of air increases very rapidly as the temperature advances — a common difference of about 25 degrees in the rise in temperature of the air, doubling the quantity of moisture it is able to take up. Hence, all other things being equal, an increase in temperature of 25 degrees in a drying-room •will reduce the time for drying about one half, and an increase of 50 degrees will reduce...
Page 24 - It must he distinctly understood that the extent of heating surface found in this way offsets only the windows and other cooling surfaces it is figured against, and does not provide for cold air admitted around loose windows or between the boarding of poorly constructed wooden houses. These latter conditions, when they exist, must be provided for by additional heating surface. EXAMPLE 1.
Page 153 - In order to effect this, the pipe is wound about first with asbestos, followed by hair felting, porous paper, manilla paper, finally thin strips of wood laid on lengthwise, and the whole fastened together by a copper wire wound spirally over all. This is thrust into a wooden log, bored to leave an intervening air chamber between the pipe and the wood, and of sufficient size to leave from 3 in.
Page 214 - ... laid in the pattern loft for some time. A square foot of cast-iron, one inch thick, weighs 37 pounds. To find what a square foot of any other thickness will weigh, multiply 37 by the thickness in . inches, or fractious of an inch. A square foot of rolled wrought-iron, one inch thick, weighs 40 Ibs. To find the weight of boiler plates, or sheet-iron, per square foot, multiply 40 by the decimal of an inch in thickness the required plates are to be. TABLE No. 11. THE FOLLOWING TABLE SHOWS THE...
Page 145 - THE QUANTITY OF WATER WHICH AIR is CAPABLE OF ABSORBING TO THE POINT OF MAXIMUM SATURATION, IN GRAINS PER CUBIC FOOT FOR VARIOUS TEMPERATURES. XIII. RELATIVE HUMIDITY OF THE AIR.
Page 43 - ... require great care; for should the boiler have an automatic water feeder set for the true water line, it will fill up, but cannot discharge again when the steam goes down ; while, if it has no feeder, there is danger of spoiling the boiler, as the water is in the pipes in the form of steam.
Page 140 - XVIII. AIR. Air is a mixture whose parts are not chemically combined, consisting of about 77 per cent, of nitrogen and 23 per cent, of oxygen, by weight, when considered pure, ie, when it is in the condition best suited to support animal life. It also contains from about ^ 0 jj 0 0.

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