Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb

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Ginn, 1889 - Greek language - 464 pages
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Contents

Perfect Infinitive with 4y
68
SECTION I
77
SECTION PAGE
80
252
87
270
93
Oi iifi with Subjunctive or Future Indicative in Denials 102
102
Future Indicative in Final Clauses 116
116
SECTION VI
137
Indicative with
145
Optative in Protasis and Apodosis
168
Future Participle representing Future Indicative 407
175
El or ef with Optative in Homer in same sense
182
SECTION PAGE
185
past Conditions with el
192
B Relative with Indefinite Antecedent
197
GENERAL CONDITIONAL RELATIVE SENTENCES
204
Special Forms of Antecedent Clause
212
Assimilation by Subjunctive or Optative
214
Causal Relative with Indicative
220
Tenses of Infinitive after ware
226
Chiefly in Aeschylus Sophocles Herodotus Xenophon 232
232
Uplv used regularly with Infinitive in Homer
243
96
247
IIpiV with Subjunctive only after Negatives
248
Manner of introducing Indirect Quotations
255
1 2 Indicative and Optative with 8ti and lis and in Indirect Questions 258260
258
Indicative and Optative in same Sentence
261
Imperfect and Pluperfect retained
263
Independent Optative generally with yip
264
677680 Subjunctive or Optative representing Interrogative Sub junctive 265
265
Indicative or Optative with in
266
Infinitive in Indirect Discourse 267
267
Mi with Infinitive in Indirect Discourse 269
269
Participle in Indirect Discourse 270272
270
Negative a with Participle
272
Mixture of Moods in Quotations 276
276
Imperfect and Pluperfect representing dependent Present and Perfect Indicative
277
SINGLE DEPENDENT CLAUSES IN INDIRECT DISCOURSE 694 General Principles of these Clauses
278
Protases with Apodosis implied in leading Verb 279
279
A INFINITIVE WITHOUT THE ARTICLE 745 Infinitive as Subject Predicate or Appositive 299
299
Infinitive as Object 746 Two classes of Object Infinitive
300
Peculiar Object Infinitives in Homer 801
301
Infinitive in Laws Treaties etc
302
Constructions after fnid cfror and Jyo
303
Infinitive in Narration like Indicative 304
304
Infinitive after Adjectives Adverbs and Nouns 758 Infinitive with Adjectives denoting Ability Fitness etc
305
Infinitive with ivbvra TrfxxHiKotTa etc used personally
306
Infinitive with Comparative and 1j
307
Infinitive with 6toTot in Homer
308
Infinitive Active or Middle rather than Passive
309
Infinitive expressing Result in Homer
310
Absolute Infinitive 776 Infinitive expressing Limitation parenthetical 810
311
Absolute etrcu as in kwv thai
312
Absolute Infinitive as Accusative of Limitation
313
Infinitive like Optative in Wishes 813314
314
Article makes the Infinitive more distinctly a Noun
316
Infinitive with toD as Object
317
Infinitive with to after Adjectives and Nouns 795797 Infinitive as Accusative after Adjectives and Nouns
318
Constructions of Infinitive as Genitive with tov 819
319
800803 Infinitive with toO tJ and rb with Prepositions 320
320
Articular Infinitive as Appositive 821
321
a Toteiv b tov rotecr c jlij Toteir rf tov
322
CHAPTER VI
329
Participle alone used absolutely
338
With avixofiai nroUru rXda roXtu
357
SECTION FAOI 912 Clause with 8n or c for Participle
361
tLipunuuu Stc for Participial Construction
362
With yiyvtbcKu three uses with Infinitive
364
Is showing that Participle expresses thought of leading subject
365
Participle with iii peculiarly used after certain Verbs of saying and thinking 366
366
Two Constructions of the Verbal in riot
368
Comparison with Latin Participle in dus
369
The Relation of the Optative to the Subjunctive and other Moods
371
Statistics of the use of the Final Particles
398
Index to the Examples
413
Greek Index
441
English Index
452

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Page 53 - ... occurrences. The prevailing view is, if we except certain monographs upon the subject, best set forth by Goodwin in his Moods and Tenses, 155, 156, 157, and I accordingly make the presentation there given the basis of my remarks. Goodwin explains this use of the aorist by saying that it gives "a more vivid statement of general truths by employing a distinct case or several distinct cases in the past to represent (as it were) all possible cases, and implying that what has occurred is likely...
Page 147 - TO FACT. 1397. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis has the adverb av. The imperfect here refers to present time or to an act as going on or repeated in past time, the aorist to a simple occurrence in past time, and the (rare) pluperfect to an act completed in past or present time. -Eg...
Page 170 - Here the protasis has the subjunctive with av after present tenses, and the optative with et after past tenses. The apodosis has the present or imperfect indicative, or some other form which implies repetition.
Page viii - whose writings have thrown light upon most of the dark places in Greek Syntax.
Page 147 - With Supposition contrary to Fact. 222. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis takes the adverb av.
Page 165 - The future as an emphatic form is especially common, when the condition contains a strong appeal to the feelings or a threat or a warning' — GOODWIN, Moods and Tenses, 447.
Page 397 - The second person singular of this future with o цу was used by the dramatists as a prohibition, without abandoning the sense which the future can always have in both positive and negative commands. In these prohibitions the future indicative, in which they had their origin, is generally used ; but the subjunctive occasionally occurs, being analogous to the ordinary aorist subjunctive with...
Page 407 - The form without v is used when the infinitive is the principal word, on which the chief force of the expression falls, while the leading verb is an auxiliary which we can express by ought, might, could, or by an adverb. 2. On the other hand, when the chief force falls on the necessity, propriety, or possibility of the act, and not on the act itself, the leading verb has v, like any other imperfect in a similar apodosis.1 Examples of the latter use are generally regular.
Page 393 - But for the eight cases of independent fir) that have been quoted, we should never know that the construction existed between Homer and Plato. We have good ground for believing that it remained as a colloquial idiom in the language, though it seldom appeared in literature until Plato revived it and restored it to common use as a half-sarcastic form of expressing mildly a disagreeable truth. In Plato the construction is not confined to this peculiar sense, for we find cases in which honest apprehension...
Page 254 - In an indirect quotation or question the original words conform to the construction of the sentence in which they are quoted. Thus the words ravra ov\opai may be quoted either directly, Xe'yet тч "т air a oii\oua i," or indirectly, Xt'y rts oTt ravTa ov\frat or фтуоч тч?

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