Plutarch's Lives: In Six Volumes, Volume 5

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J. and R. Tonson, 1758 - Greece
 

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Page 170 - Lacedaemonians courteously; and, neither affronting, nor ruining the dignity of Sparta, but permitting them to enjoy their own laws and polity, and sacrificing to the gods, dislodged the third day; for he heard that there was a great war kindled in...
Page 455 - ... the brute creatures came to assist and take care of him in his undeserved affliction; and therefore, partly by entreaty, partly by force, they took him up, and carried him in his litter towards the seaside.
Page 130 - Phylarchus says, that this was Daphne, the daughter of Amyclas, who, flying from Apollo, was transformed into a laurel, and honoured by that god with the gift of prophecy. But be it as it will...
Page 390 - ... to the gods, and decreed that Pausanias should be presented with a crown. Demosthenes appeared publicly in a rich dress, with a chaplet on his head, though it were but the seventh day since the death of his daughter, as is said by...
Page 143 - Borysthenite, who, coming to Sparta, was very diligent in instructing the youth. Sphaerus was one of the chief of Zeno the Citiean's scholars; and it is likely that he admired the manly temper of Cleomenes, and inflamed his generous ambition. The ancient Leonidas, as story saith, being asked, What manner of poet he thought Tyrtaeus? replied...
Page 354 - Caesar's with their oars ; and, on their responding, the whole body of the ships, forming into a single fleet, rowed up direct to the city. Antony had no sooner seen this, but the horse deserted him, and went over to Caesar; and his foot being defeated, he retired into the city, crying out that Cleopatra had betrayed him to the enemies he had made for her sake. She, being afraid lest in his fury and despair he might do her a mischief, fled to her monument, and letting down the falling doors, which...
Page 372 - ... talents, and that he was wronged by his guardians, part of his fortune being embezzled by them, and the rest neglected ; insomuch that even his teachers were defrauded of their salaries. This was the reason that he did not obtain the liberal education that he should have had ; besides that on account of weakness and delicate health, his mother would not let him exert himself, and his teachers forbore...
Page 176 - Ptolemy, the lieutenant of the city, advancing against them in a chariot, they set upon, dispersed his guards and attendants, and pulling him out of the chariot, killed him upon the place. Then they made toward the castle, designing to break open the prison, and take the prisoners to their assistance ; but the keepers were too quick for them, and secured the passages.
Page 455 - Cicero had heretofore defended when he was under a Profecution for the Murder of his own Father. Thefe Officers finding the Doors fhut forced them open, when Cicero not appearing, and Thofe within faying, they knew not where he was...
Page 430 - Theophrastus he was wont to call his peculiar delight ; and being asked which of Demosthenes his orations he liked best? He answered, 'The longest' ' And as for eminent men of his own time, either for eloquence or philosophy, there was not one of them whom he did not, by writing or speaking favourably of, render more illustrious.

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