A Writer's Diary Volume 2: 1877-1881

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Northwestern University Press, Jul 20, 1997 - Biography & Autobiography - 1455 pages
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This is the second volume of the complete collection of writings that has been called Dostoevsky's boldest experiment with literary form; it is a uniquely encyclopedic forum of fictional and nonfictional genres. The Diary's radical format was matched by the extreme range of its contents. In a single frame it incorporated an astonishing variety of material: short stories; humorous sketches; reports on sensational crimes; historical predictions; portraits of famous people; autobiographical pieces; and plans for stories, some of which were never written while others appeared in the Diary itself.
 

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A writer's diary

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Volume 1 of this new translation, published last year, contains Gary Saul Morson's 117-page "Introductory Study," which means that Volume 2 is rather an orphan on its own. A Writer's Diary began in ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
811
November
820
CHAPTER
826
The Boy Celebrating His Saints Day
844
Homegrown Giants and a Humiliated Son of
855
Metternichs and Don Quixotes
864
The Issue of the Day
874
The Russian Solution to the Problem
881
Anna Karenina as a Fact of Special Importance
1067
CHAPTER THREE
1078
On the Uneducated and Illiterate Russian Peoples
1088
CHAPTER
1103
Thats It Yet It Isnt It A Reference to What I
1111
What Austria Is Now Thinking About
1117
Whos Knocking at the Door? Who Will Come
1122
October
1139

CHAPTER
889
The Most Appropriate Thoughts for the Present
895
CHAPTER
901
Status in Statu Forty Centuries of Existence
909
But Long Live Brotherhood
915
An Isolated Case
922
CHAPTER
929
Does Shed Blood Save Us?
937
July and August
963
CHAPTER
967
A Plan for a Satirical Novel of Contemporary Life
978
CHAPTER
985
Diplomacy Facing World Problems
994
CHAPTER THREE
1003
Both Angry and Strong
1011
A Rather Unpleasant Secret
1019
Golden Tailcoats StraightLine People
1025
CHAPTER
1033
The Case of the Dzhunkovsky Parents and Their
1045
An Imaginary Speech by the Presiding Judge
1054
CHAPTER
1061
The Same Rule Only in a New Guise
1146
We Have Only Stumbled over a New Fact
1152
The Russian Gentleman A Gentleman Cannot
1158
CHAPTER THREE
1169
The Escapade of The StockExchange News
1175
CHAPTER
1181
Some Quite Special Remarks about the Slavs That
1199
Once More For the Last Time Some
1212
Distortions and Manipulation of the Evidence
1226
Am I an Enemy of Children? On What the Word
1240
Poet and Citizen General Views of Nekrasov as
1256
A Witness in Nekrasovs Favor
1260
CHAPTER
1281
CHAPTER THREE
1296
Two Halves
1312
CHAPTER
1333
Forget Immediate Problems So That the Roots
1343
CHAPTER
1361
NOTES
1379
INDEX
1445
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский; IPA: [ˈfʲodər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ dəstɐˈjefskʲɪj] ; 11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881 ) sometimes spelled Dostoevsky, was a Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. Dostoyevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society. Although Dostoyevsky began writing books in the mid-1850s, his best remembered work was done in his last years, including Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. He wrote eleven novels, three novellas, seventeen short novels and three essays and is often acknowledged by critics as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature. Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born and raised within the grounds of the Mariinsky hospital in Moscow, in Russia.

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