Bibliopegia: Or, The Art of Bookbinding in All Its Branches; Illustrated with Engravings

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Simpkin, Marshall, and Company, 1848 - Bookbinding - 166 pages
 

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Page 22 - ... who gathers the sheets into packets, by placing two, three, or four, upon a piece of tin plate of the same size, and covering them with another piece of tin plate, and thus proceeding by alternating tin plates and bundles of sheets, till a sufficient quantity have been put together, which will depend on the stiffness and thickness of the paper. The packet is then passed between the rollers, and is received by the man who turns the winch, and who has time to lay the sheets on one side, and to...
Page 161 - The line immediately under the running-title on the pages of a book. Inset. The pages cut off in folding, and placed in the middle of the folded sheet. Justification. The observance that the pages of works, bound in one volume, agree in length and breadth, so as to insure their not being cut into the print Kettle stitch.
Page 78 - Henriade," published by himself, to Louis XVIII., most elegantly ornamented in this style. It was executed by M. Bullier, bookbinder, of Tours, and presented on one side a miniature portrait of Henry IV., and on the other, a similar one of Louis XVIII. ; both perfect likenesses. The greatest difficulty consisted in the portraits, which were first imprinted on paper, very moist, and immediately applied to the cover, on which they were impressed with a flat roller. When perfectly dry, they were coloured...
Page 8 - ... with heraldic accuracy on both sides of the volume. When we state that more than 57,000 impressions of tools have been required to produce this wonderful exemplar of ingenuity and skill, some idea may be formed of the time and labour necessary for its execution.
Page 22 - A committee met at Mr. Burn's house, for the purpose of examining the rolling press employed by him as a substitute for the beating which books require previous to being bound. The press consists of two iron cylinders about a foot in diameter, adjustable in the usual way, by means of a screw, and put in motion by the power of one man, or of two, if more convenient, applied to one or two cranked handles. In front of the press sits a boy who gathers the sheets into packets...
Page 78 - The shades must be tried on pieces of refuse leather, as, being spirit-colours, when once laid on, no art can soften them down if too strong, and a peculiar lightness of touch will be necessary to produce effect. Portraits, &c. may also be executed in this manner, and many superb designs have at times been executed by the best binders of this country and France. M. Didot, bookseller of Paris, presented a copy of the " Henriade" published by himself, to Louis XVIII., most elegantly ornamented in this...
Page 10 - Homer, the bard, who sung in highest strains The festive gift, a goblet for his pains ; Falernian gave Horace, Virgil, fire, And barley wine my British muse inspire, Barley wine, first from Egypt's learned shore, And this the gift to me from Calvert's store...
Page 152 - ... leaves, when laid flat, are separated from each other by intervals scarcely sensible. The acid is then poured in, making it fall on the sides of the tub, in order that the leaves may not be deranged by its motion. When the workman judges, by the whiteness of the paper, that it has been sufficiently acted upon by the acid, it is drawn off by a cock at the bottom of the tub, and its place is supplied by clear fresh water, which weakens and carries off the remains of the acid, as well as the strong...
Page 11 - ... had lost much of that ability he had been so largely endowed with. Pressed down with poverty and disease, he breathed his last in Duke's Court, St. Martin's Lane, on the 20th of November, 1797. His remains were interred in the burying-ground of St. Martin's in the Fields, at the expense of Mr. Thos. Payne, who, as before stated, had been his early friend, and who, for the last eight years of his life, had rendered him a regular pecuniary assistance both for the support of his body and the performance...
Page 11 - The great merit of Roger Payne lay in his taste — in his choice of ornaments, and especially in the working of them. It is impossible to excel him in these two particulars. His favourite colour was that of olive, which he called Venetian. In his lining, joints, and inside ornaments, our hero generally, and sometimes melancholily failed. He was fond of what he called purple paper, the colour of which was as violent as its texture was coarse.

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