Gardening for Children

Front Cover
Charles Alexander Johns
Charles Cox, 1848 - Gardening - 168 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 103 - ... oif from their day retreats, or you may lay cabbage leaves about the ground, especially on the beds which they frequent. Every morning examine these leaves, and you will find a great many taking refuge beneath ; if they plague you very much, search for their retreat, which you can find by their slimy track, and hunt there for them day by day ; lime and salt are very annoying to snails and slugs; a pinch of salt kills them, and they will not touch fresh lime ; it is a common practice to sprinkle...
Page 163 - Fruit should always be gathered in dry weather, and carefully laid in baskets, not dropped in ; the slightest bruise will cause fruit to decay. All bulbs and tubers should be placed in the ground before they begin to shoot; if suffered to form leaves and roots in the air, they waste strength. Never remove the leaves from bulbs after flowering, until they are quite dead ; as long as the leaves retain life, they are employed in preparing nourishment and transmitting it to the roots.
Page 163 - By checking the growth of plants, you throw strength into the flowers and fruit ; this is the reason why gardeners nip off the terminal shoots of beans and other such vegetables ; on this principle, too, is founded the valuable art of pruning. Generally speaking, the smaller the quantity of fruit on a tree, the higher the flavour: therefore, thin all fruits in moderation, but avoid excess ; a single gooseberry on a tree, or a single bunch of grapes on a vine, no matter how fine it may be, is a disgrace...
Page 165 - Though rapid growth is desirable in succulent vegetables, this is not the case with most flowering shrubs, which form bushy and therefore handsomer plants when grown slowly. Few plants thrive in stagnant water; potted plants should, therefore, always have a thorough drainage of broken pots or brick, and should not be allowed to stand in damp saucers ; they require but little water during the winter ; but when they begin to grow they should be liberally supplied. Plants in pots are more liable to...
Page 156 - ... other purposes than the cost of the quantity of seed which you will require ; besides which, you will have a better crop from seed raised in a different soil. The roots of very young plants are not strong enough to bear removal ; the best time for transplanting seedlings, is when they have made from four to six proper leaves ; for by this time the roots will be able to perform their proper functions. Plants when exposed to the action of light transmit moisture copiously through their leaves ;...
Page 154 - ... possible. Repeat these long breaths as • much as you please. Done in a cold room is much better, because the air is much denser, and will act much more powerfully in expanding the chest. Exercising the chest in this manner will enlarge the capability and size of the lungs. Gardening; Maxims.— Grow nothing carelessly ; -whatever is worth growing at all, is worth growing well. Many kinds of garden-seeds lose their •vegetative power if kept over the first year ; be sure, therefore, to sow...
Page 104 - CATERPILLARS and APHIDES. — A garden syringe or engine, with a cap on the pipe full of very minute holes, will wash away these disagreeable visitors very quickly. You must bring the pipe close to the plant, and pump hard, so as to have considerable force on, and the plant, however badly infested, will soon be cleared without receiving any injury. Every time that you use the syringe or garden engine, you must immediately rake...
Page 162 - ... weather should be chosen even for bringing out plants from a green-house. Remove all dead flowers from perennials unless you wish to save seed ; the plants will thus be prevented from exhausting themselves. To procure a succession of roses, prune down to three eyes on all the branches of some trees as soon as the buds begin to expand ; defer the same operation with others, until the leaves are expanding; in the former case the three buds will bear early flowers ; in the latter they will not begin...
Page 103 - SLUGS and SNAILS are great enemies to every kind of garden-plant, whether flower or vegetable ; they wander in the night to feed, and return at daylight to their haunts ; the shortest and surest direction is, ' rise early, catch them, and kill them.
Page 45 - ... labor that makes things valuable, but their being valuable that makes them worth laboring for. And God, having judged in His wisdom that it is not good for man to be idle, has so appointed things by His providence, that few of the things that are most desirable can be obtained without labor. It is ordained that man should eat bread in the sweat of his face ; and almost all the necessaries, comforts, and luxuries of life are obtained only by labor.

Bibliographic information