An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of Understanding ; Collated with Desmaizeaux's Ed. To which is Prefixed the Life of the Author

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Mundell & Son, 1801 - 308 pages
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Contents

Thirdly Using Words varioufly is trissing with them
11
The coming to the Use of Reason not the Time
12
Secondly A Part of the Desinition predicated of any Term
13
That a man should be busy in thinking and yet
19
nate fhows itself clearest
27
Instance in keeping Compacts
30
Obj Innate Principles may be corrupted answered
45
Difference of Mens Discoveries depends upon the dis
66
In the reception of simple Ideas the Understanding
86
CHAP VII
97
Sect
119
CHAP X
120
Contemplation i Memory
121
3Attention Repetition Pleasure and Pain six Ideas t5 Ideas fade in the Memory Constantly repeated Ideas can scarce be lost
122
CHAP XI
123
Of Discerning
127
CHAP II
129
Compounding 7 Brutes compound but little
130
Naming 9 Abstraction
131
Brutes abstract not 12 13 Idiots and Madmen
133
Method
134
These are the Beginnings of Human Knowledge 16 Appeal to Experience 17 Dark Room
135
CHAP XII
136
Made voluntarily 3 Are either Modes Substances or relation
137
CHAP XIII
139
Sect
155
A good measure of Time must divide its whole Dura
163
283I Eternity
169
Sxct
3 The Means of evading Probabilities ║ff Suppoſed
3
Modes
4
All our Ideas are of the one or the other of these
5
Simple Idcat the Materials of all our Knowledge
9
Secondly Because of obscure and impersect Idea
10
Idea of Spiritual Substances as clear as of bodily Sub
15
A Vacuum beyond the utmost Pounds of Body
20
The Cohesion of solid Parts and Impulse the primary
21
Secondary Qualities twosold sirst immediately per
26
Principles must be examined
27
Ideas of Body and Spirit compared
29
Of Duration
44
Other Considerations about innate Principles both speculativf
75
Consusion without reserence to Names hardly con
89
CHAP IX
210
Of Perception
260
The Way fhown how we come by any Knowledge
i
CHAP V
v
CHAP XVI
xi
CHAP XIII
xiii
ZCT
1
Man knows that he himself
2
He knows also that nothing cannot produce a Being therefore something eternal
3
First Of Identity or Diversity
4
Secondly Relation
5
Whole and Part not innate Ideas
6
That Men know them when they come to the
7
Knowledge actual or habitual
8
Habitual Knowledge twosold CHAP IL
9
The Soul thinks not always sor this wants Proofsi
10
Theresore there has been an eternal Wisdom
11
Suitable to Gods goodness that all men should have
12
Fifthly Because os doubtsul Terms
13
Intuitive
14
Perception the Inlet of Knowledge
15
On tlii6 Hypothesis the Soul must have Ideas not
16
Demonstrative
17
Idea of Substance not innate
18
First Ad Ferecundiam
19
2I Principles not innate because of little Use or little Cer
43
tainty
63
to As far as any such Coexistence can be known so
68
What is requisite sor our Knowledge of Substances
75
Proof
77
1I What Use these general Maxims have
85
Maxims if care be not taken in the Use of Words
92
is not cogitative 15 Secondly One Particle alone of Matter canfldt be cogitative 16 Thirdly A System of incogitative matter cannot e cogitative
117
Whether in Motion or at Rest 18 19 Matter not coeternal with an eternal Mind
119
By which Morality also may be made clearer
137
Why Time cures some Disorders in the Mind which
138
are not as we please
145
C HAP I
185
Sect
188
Sect
189
Depends on Proofs 4 But not so easy 5 Not without precedent Doubt 6 Not so clear 7 Each Step must have intuitive Evidence 8 Hence the Mistake ex...
193
OF THE CONDUCT OF THE UNDERSTANDING
227

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Page xi - For if we will reflect on our own ways of thinking, we shall find that sometimes the mind perceives the agreement or disagreement of two ideas immediately by themselves, without the intervention of any other: and this, I think, we may call 'intuitive knowledge.
Page 62 - I would be understood to mean, that notice which the mind takes of its own operations, and the manner of them, by reason whereof there come to be ideas of these operations in the understanding.
Page 95 - ... some motion must be thence continued by our nerves or animal spirits, by some parts of our bodies, to the brain or the seat of sensation, there to produce in our minds the particular ideas we have of them.
Page 190 - ... a new set of discoveries communicated by God immediately; which reason vouches the truth of, by the testimony and proofs it gives that they come from God. So that he that takes away reason to make way for revelation, puts out the light of both, and does muchwhat the same as if he would persuade a man to put out his eyes, the better to receive the remote light of an invisible star by a telescope.
Page 8 - From all which it is evident, that the extent of our knowledge comes not only short of the reality of things, but even of the extent of our own ideas.
Page xii - This part of knowledge is irresistible, and like bright sunshine forces itself immediately to be perceived, as soon as ever the mind turns its view that way; and leaves no room for hesitation, doubt, or examination, but the mind is presently filled with the clear light of it. It is on this intuition that depends all the certainty and evidence of all our knowledge...
Page 62 - ... got; which operations, when the soul comes to reflect on and consider, do furnish the understanding with another set of ideas which could not be had from things without; and such are perception, thinking, doubting, believing, reasoning...
Page 78 - When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas.
Page 237 - ... harangues and popular addresses, they are certainly, in all discourses that pretend to inform or instruct, wholly to be avoided ; and, where truth and knowledge are concerned, cannot but be thought a great fault either of the language or person 'that makes use of them.
Page 177 - I think it may not be amiss to take notice, that, however faith be opposed to reason, faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind ; which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to any thing but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it. He that believes without having any reason for believing, may be in love with his own fancies ; but neither seeks truth as he ought, nor pays the obedience due to his Maker...

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