Swallowdale

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David R. Godine Publisher, 1985 - Juvenile Fiction - 448 pages
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The second title in Arthur Ransome's classic series for anyone captivated by the world of adventure follows the Walker family and friends through a shipwreck, a camp on the mainland, a secret valley and cave, and a trek through the mountains.
 

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Review: Swallowdale (Swallows and Amazons #2)

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

enjoyed this book so far, but lost it for awhile & had to return it to the library so many times, then bought our own copy, and just have not gotten back into it yet...will pick it up again later. I ... Read full review

Contents

THE SWALLOW AND HER CREW
17
WILD CAT ISLAND
28
HI HORSESHOE COVE AND THE AMAZON PIRATES
42
THE ABLESEAMAN AND THE BOY EXPLORE
55
CAPTAIN JOHN HANGS ON
71
SALVAGE
82
SHIPS CARPENTER
95
RIO AND HOLLY HOWE
107
WELCOME ARROW
250
SHOWING THE PARROT HIS FEATHERS
258
BEFORE THE MARCH
271
XXm OVERLAND TO THE AMAZON
279
THE NOONTIDE OWL
291
UP RIVER
299
THE HALFWAY CAMP
315
XXVn THE SUMMIT OF KANCHENJUNGA
327

SWAINSONS FARM
125
MAKING THE BEST OF IT
129
THE ABLESEAMAN IN COMMAND
141
XH SWALLOWDALE
153
Xffl SHIFTING CAMP
165
SETTLING IN
181
LIFE IN SWALLOWDALE
190
SURPRISE ATTACK
203
LATER AND LATER AND LATER
219
XVm CANDLEGREASE
233
NO NEWS
243
FOG ON THE MOOR
341
WOUNDED MAN
351
MEDICINE MAN
363
WIGWAM NIGHT
373
FOG ON THE LAKE
382
THE EMPTY CAMP
395
STRETCHERPARTY
399
THE RACE
421
WILD CAT ISLAND ONCE AGAIN
431
Copyright

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Page 2 - COOT CLUB PIGEON POST WE DIDN'T MEAN TO GO TO SEA SECRET WATER THE BIG SIX MISSEE LEE THE PICTS AND THE MARTYRS GREAT NORTHERN?
Page 13 - We adored the place. Coming to it, we used to run down to the lake, dip our hands in and wish, as if we had just seen the new moon. Going away from it, we were half drowned in tears. While away from it, as children and as grown-ups, we dreamt about it. No matter where I was, wandering about the world, I used at night to look for the North Star and, in my mind's eye, could see the beloved skyline of great hills beneath it. Swallows and Amazons grew out of those old memories. I could not help writing...
Page 17 - ... shouted the look-out man sang out, "Sail on starboard quarter, sir." All hands were up on the cry full of the wildest hope. "Trip the drogues and get them in," Cruiser said, unshipping the steering-oar and reshipping the rudder. "Get the sail on her." They ran in the drogues to an overhand chorus: — A handy ship and a handy crew, Handy, my boys, so handy; A handy mate and a second mate, too, Handy, my boys, away O.
Page 13 - I have often been asked how I came to write Swallows and Amazons. The answer is that it had its beginning long, long ago when, as children, my brother, my sisters and I spent most of our holidays on a farm at the south end of Coniston. We played in or on the lake or on the hills above it, finding friends in the farmers and shepherds and charcoal-burners whose smoke rose from the coppice woods along the shore. We adored the place. Coming to it, we used to...

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About the author (1985)

Children's author Arthur Ransome was born in Leeds, England on January 18, 1884. As a child, he spent many vacations sailing, camping, and exploring the countryside in England's Lake Country. He studied chemistry for one year at Yorkshire College before dropping out to become a writer. He worked for a London publisher and then for the Manchester Guardian newspaper. He wrote his first book, Bohemia in London, in 1907 and went to study folklore in Russia in 1913. In 1916, he published Old Peter's Russian Tales, a collection of 21 folktales. During World War I, he became a reporter for the Daily News and covered the war on the Eastern Front. While in Russia, he also covered the Russian Revolution in 1917. He eventually settled in England's Lake District with his second wife. In 1929, he wrote Swallows and Amazons, which was the first book in his well-know Swallows and Amazons series about children who sail and explore the lakes and mountains of England. He drew inspiration for the books from his own childhood memories. In 1936, he won the Carnegie Medal for children's literature for Pigeon Post. He died on June 3, 1967.

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