Cherokee Dance and Drama

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1993 - Performing Arts - 112 pages
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Traditionally, the Cherokees dance to ensure individual health and social welfare. According to legend, the dance songs bequeathed to them by the Stone Coat monster will assuage all the ills of life that the monster brought. Winter dance (including the Booger Dance, which expresses the Cherokees’ anxiety at the white invasion) are to be given only during times of frost, lest they affect the growth of vegetation by attracting cold and death. The summer dance (the Green Corn Ceremony and the Ballplayer’s Dance) are associated with crops and vegetation. Other dances are purely for social intercourse and entertainment or are prompted by specific events in the community.

When it was first published in 1951, this description of the dances of a conservative Eastern Cherokee band was hailed as a scholarly contribution that could not be duplicated, Frank G. Speak and Leonard Broom had achieved the close and sustained interaction that very best ethnological fieldwork requires. Their principal informant, will West Long, upheld the unbroken ceremonial tradition of the Big Cove band, near Cherokee, North Carolina.

 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE REPERTORY OF DANCES
19
Accompany Dance Songs
21
Gourd Booger Mask
26
Key to Dance Diagrams
43
Green Corn Ceremony First Stage Mens Part
46
Green Corn Ceremony First Stage Womens Part
48
Green Corn Ceremony First Stage Combined Part First Movement
50
Ballplayers Dance Mens Part
56
Ballplayers Dance Womens Part
61
Beaver Dance First Movement
70
Beaver Dance Second Movement
71
Corn Dance First and Fourth Movements and Second Movement
78
ANIMAL HUNTING FORMULAS AND RITES
84
NOTES
99
BIBLIOGRAPHY
105

Green Corn Ceremony First Stage Combined Part Second and Third Movements
51

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About the author (1993)

The late Frank G. Speck , a distinguished American ethnographer, was associated with the University of Pennsylvania throughout his academic life. Leonard Broom has conducted research chiefly on ethnic and racial minorities and no social mobility and stratification. He is Professor Emeritus in the Institute of Advanced Studies of the Australian National University, Canberra, and Research Associate in Sociology in the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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