St. Patrick's Purgatory: An Essay on the Legends of Purgatory, Hell, and Paradise, Current During the Middle Ages

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John Russell Smith, 1844 - Christian literature - 192 pages
 

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Page 186 - That tract of earth is not over mid -earth fellow to many peopled lands ; but it is withdrawn through the Creator's might from wicked doers. Beauteous is all the plain, with delights blessed, with the sweetest of earth's odors : unique is that island, noble the Maker, lofty, in powers abounding, who the land founded.
Page 25 - Paradise is neither in heaven nor on earth. The book says that Noah's flood was forty fathoms high, over the highest hills that are on earth ; and Paradise is forty fathoms higher than Noah's flood was, and it hangeth between heaven and earth wonderfully, as the ruler of all things made it. And it is perfectly level both in length and breadth. There is neither hollow nor hill ; nor is there frost nor snow, hail nor rain ; but there is fons vitae, that is, the well of life.
Page 121 - ... punishment appropriated to him. The visitor was here left for a moment by his conductors ; and the demons seized upon him, and would have thrown him into the fire, had not St. Peter suddenly arrived to rescue him. He was carried thence to a fair plain, where he saw thieves carrying heavy collars of iron, red hot, about their necks, hands, and feet. He saw here a great burning pitchy river, issuing from hell, and an iron bridge over it, which appeared very broad and easy for the virtuous to pass...
Page 174 - A lightless sulphur, chok'd with smoky fogs Of an infected darkness : in this place Dwell many thousand thousand sundry sorts Of never-dying deaths: there damned souls Roar without pity; there are gluttons fed With toads and adders; there is burning oil Pour'd down the drunkard's throat; the usurer Is forced to sup whole draughts of molten gold...
Page 163 - Whereas, the superstitions of popery are greatly increased and upheld by the pretended sanctity of places, especially of a place called St. Patrick's Purgatory, in the county of...
Page 163 - Patrick's purgatory in the county of Donegal and of wells, to which pilgrimages are made by vast numbers at certain seasons, by which not only the peace of the public is greatly disturbed, but the safety of the government also hazarded, by the riotous and unlawful assembling together of many...
Page 27 - Sunday, he says, the people of a village in England were coming out of church on a thick cloudy day, when they saw the anchor of a ship hooked to one of the tomb-stones ; the cable, which was tightly stretched, hanging down from the air. The people were...
Page 103 - Trompes, as thoughe it were of a gret feste. This Vale is alle fulle of Develes, and hathe ben alle weys. And men seyn there, that it is on of the entrees of Helle.
Page 189 - ... in that land hateful enmity, nor wail nor vengeance, evil-token none, old age nor misery, nor the narrow death, nor loss of life, nor coming of enemy, nor sin nor strife, nor painful exile, nor poor one's toil, nor desire of wealth, nor care nor sleep, nor grievous sickness, nor winter's darts, nor dread of tempests rough under heaven, nor the hard frost with cold chill icicles striketh any. There nor hail nor rime on the land descend, nor windy cloud...

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