Soviet-American Relations, 1917-1920, Volume II: The Decision to Intervene

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Princeton University Press, Jul 13, 2021 - History - 513 pages
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In 1918 the U.S. government decided to involve itself with the Russian Revolution by sending troops to Siberia. This book re-creates that unhappily memorable storythe arrival of British marines at Murmansk, the diplomatic maneuvering, the growing Russian hostility, the uprising of Czechoslovak troops in central Siberia which threatened to overturn the Bolsheviks, the acquisitive ambitions of the Japanese in Manchuria, and finally the decision by President Wilson to intervene with American troops. Of this period Kennan writes, "Never, surely, in the history of American diplomacy, has so much been paid for so little."

 

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Contents

PROLOGUE
3
THE RUSSIAN NORTH
15
COMPLICATIONS IN MURMANSK
31
SIBERIA IN MARCH 1918
58
THE FIRST JAPANESE LANDING
84
THE WRAITH OF ALLIEDSOVIET COLLABORATION
107
THE CZECHOSLOVAK LEGION
136
ROBINS AND SUMMERS
166
PRIVATE AMERICAN INFLUENCES
322
THE RIPENING OF THE SIBERIAN QUESTION
340
DECISION ON MURMANSK AND ARCHANGEL
363
THE DECISION ON SIBERIA
381
THE DESPATCH OF AMERICAN FORCES TO RUSSIA
405
JULY AND THE FINAL BREAKUP
430
THE END AT MOSCOW
453
EPILOGUE
470

ARTHUR BULLARD AND THE COMPUB
190
ROBINS DEPARTURE
208
Envoi TO ROBINS
233
THE NORTH IN APRIL AND MAY
245
THE AMERICANS AND THE CZECH UPRISING
277
CONSUL POOLE AND THE FUTURE OF THE CZECHS
296
APPENDICES
475
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
486
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
488
INDEX
497
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