An Essay on Genius

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W. Strahan; T. Cadell, 1774 - Aesthetics - 434 pages
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"This book covers the following topics related to genius: the nature of genius; the province and criterion of genius; to what faculty of mind genius belongs; how genius arrives from the imagination; the influence of judgment upon genius; the dependence of genius on other intellectual powers; the general sources of the varieties of genius; qualities of ideas which produce association; the influence of the passions on association; reflections of the principles of association; ideas suggested, either by sensations, or by other ideas; the combination of associating principles; the predominance of the associating principles; flexibility of imagination; the varieties of memory, and their influence on genius; the varieties of judgment, and their influence on genius; the kinds of genius; genius twofold, for science, or the the arts; the structure of imagination which distinguishes the two kinds of genius; how the two kinds of genius differ in respect of the assistance which they derive from memory; how the two kinds of genius differ in respect of the assistance which they derive from judgment; the two kinds of genius farther compared and distinguished; taste essential to genius for the arts; the power of execution necessary to genius for the arts; and the union of different kinds of genius"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).
 

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Page 108 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night, And would have told him half his Troy was burn'd; But Priam found the fire ere he his tongue, And I my Percy's death ere thou report'st it. This thou would'st say, 'Your son did thus and thus; Your brother thus; so fought the noble Douglas...
Page 224 - Windsor, thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me and make me my lady thy wife.
Page 333 - First the flaming red Sprung vivid forth; the tawny orange next; And next delicious yellow; by whose side Fell the kind beams of all-refreshing green. Then the pure blue, that swells autumnal skies, Ethereal...
Page 144 - ... for he was not able to utter a word without it. One of his clients, who was more merry than wise, stole it from him one day in the midst of his pleading; but he had better have let it alone, for he lost his cause by his jest.
Page 29 - There is not a more painful action of the mind than invention ; yet in dreams it works with that ease and activity that we are not sensible when the faculty is employed. For instance, I believe every one, some time or other, dreams that he is reading papers, books, or letters ; in which case the invention prompts so readily, that the mind is imposed...
Page 77 - We, Hermia, like two artificial gods, Created with our needles both one flower, Both on one fampler, fitting on one cufhion ; Both warbling of one fong, both in one key ; As if our hands, our fides, voices, and minds Had been incorp'rate.
Page 31 - The first and highest is the discovering and finding out of proofs ; the second, the regular and methodical disposition of them, and laying them in a clear and fit order, to make their connexion and force be plainly and easily perceived ; the third is the perceiving their connexion ; and the fourth, a making a right conclusion.
Page 100 - Greek legend, a monster with the head of a lion, the body of a goat, and the tail of a dragon.
Page 6 - Genius. — Genius is properly the faculty of invention, by means of which a man is qualified for making new discoveries in science, or for producing original works of art. We may ascribe taste, judgment, or knowledge, to a man who is incapable of invention; but we cannot reckon him a man of genius.
Page 248 - tis, to caft one's eyes fo low ! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air.

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