The History of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut: Including East Windsor, South Windsor, and Ellington, Prior to 1768, the Date of Their Separation from the Old Town; and Windsor, Bloomfield and Windsor Locks, to the Present Time. Also the Genealogies and Genealogical Notes of Those Families which Settled Within the Limits of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut, Prior to 1800

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C. B. Norton, 1859 - Bloomfield (Conn.) - 922 pages
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i have the bibles from stoughton family and the samuel moore famil y dating from 1626 some of your stuff dates and peole are incorrect according fromelijah stoughtons writings from the 1626 bible any questions anneadams@myfairpoint.net 8023553534 8028930039 iv had these and my grandfather for about 50 years i was always interested 

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Page ix - Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.
Page 279 - As you are now, so once was I. As I am now so you must be. Prepare for death and follow me.
Page 444 - Forasmuch as the good education of children is of singular behoof and benefit to any commonwealth, and, whereas, many parents and masters are too indulgent and negligent of their duty in that kind...
Page 405 - An incessant attention to preserve inviolate those exalted rights and liberties of human nature for which they have fought and bled, and without which the high rank of a rational being is a curse instead of a blessing.
Page 405 - An unalterable determination to promote and cherish, between the respective states, that union and national honor so essentially necessary to their happiness and the future dignity of the American empire. To render permanent the cordial affection subsisting among the officers : This spirit will dictate brotherly kindness in all things, and particularly extend to the most substantial acts of beneficence, according to the ability of the society, towards those officers and their families who unfortunately...
Page 444 - ... to teach by themselves or others, their children and apprentices so much learning, as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue, and knowledge of the capital laws...
Page 405 - ... the officers of the American army do hereby in the most solemn manner associate, constitute, and combine themselves into one society of friends, to endure as long as they shall endure, or any of their eldest male posterity, and in failure thereof, the collateral branches, who may be judged worthy of becoming its supporters and members.
Page 453 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on...
Page 446 - That where any town shall increase to the number of one hundred families, or householders, they shall set up a grammar school, the masters thereof being able to instruct youths, so far as they may be fitted, for the university, and if any town neglect the performance hereof above one year, then every such town shall pay five pounds per annum, to the next such school, till they shall perform this order.
Page 386 - New lords new laws. The Generals Washington and Lee are upon the lines every day. New orders from his Excellency are read to the respective regiments every morning after prayers. The strictest government is taking place, and great distinction is made between officers and soldiers. Every one is made to know his place and keep in it, or be tied up and receive thirty or forty lashes according to his crime. Thousands are at work every day from four till eleven o'clock in the morning.

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