Specimen of an Etimological Vocabulary, Or, Essay, by Means of the Analitic Method, to Retrieve the Antient Celtic

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L. Davis and C. Reymers, in Holbourn, printers to the Royal Society, 1768 - Celtic languages - 231 pages
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Page 93 - ... of life. It was considered as the boundary day, that divided the confines of winter and summer, allusively to which, there was instituted a sportful .war between two parties ; the one in defence of the continuance of winter, the other for bringing in the summer.
Page i - The author of a pamphlet entitled " The Way to Things by Words, and Words by Things," informs us that our ancestors held an anniversary assembly on May-day, and that the column of May (whence our May-pole) was the great standard of justice on the Ey-commons or fields of May. Here it was that the people if they saw cause deposed or punished their governors, their barons...
Page 93 - This is, he farther tells us, one of the antientest customs, which from the remotest ages, has been by repetition from year to year, perpetuated down to our days, not being at this instant totally exploded, especially in the lower class of life. It was considered as the boundary day, that divided the confines of winter and summer, allusively to which, there was instituted a sportful .war between two parties ; the one in defence of the continuance of winter, the other for bringing...
Page 118 - If any man love not the Lord Jefus Chrift, " let him be anathema, Maranatha ;"|| than which no.
Page 229 - Nothing, certainly, is more reafonable than his plea, ' that whoever conftders the vail comprehenfivenefs of this plan, and the aids, of all kinds, which itmuft, to have juftice done to it, indifpenfibly and implicitly require, will eafily allow the undertaking to be not only impoffible to a fmall private fortune, but even where there might be a large one, the work itfelf to imply fo much of propofed utility to the public, as not to be without fome right to folicit the affiflance of the public.
Page 217 - This Court owes its origin to Henry IV., who, deposing Richard II., usurped the crown ; and, possessing the Duchy of Lancaster in right of his mother, was seized thereof as duke, as well as king. But imagining his right to the duchy better than that to the crown, he resolved to secure the same by separating it from the crown ; which being effected, he erected this court for its use, wherein all matters of law and equity belonging to the duchy, or County Palatine of Lancaster, are heard and decided...
Page 117 - ... usually erected on an eminence. They consisted of a certain number of upright stones, placed in a circular form, with one, more exalted than the rest, sometimes elevated without the circumference ; but more frequently placed in the centre. Of all figures, the Druids most affected the circular. Their cir, hirs, shires, churches, all took their appellation and form from the radical hir or cir, a circle. Church or Kir-rock, the circle of stones; by contraction it is Kirk, and by corruption, Church....
Page 62 - Writer) signifies a head Druid or -Divine : Hence it was, that when the Christians, by way of exploding the Druids, turned them into Ridicule, in their Feast or Holiday of Fools, one of the Buffoon Personages was a Merry Andrew.
Page 5 - And why beholdeft thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceiveft not the beam that is in thine own eye?
Page 2 - the French word for a fable (apologue} does not, with all its air of a Gr. found, derive from АтгоАсугГ, but from the Celt, habul-laigh a fable in verfe :

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