Dionysius Longinus On the Sublime:: Translated from the Greek, with Notes and Observations, and Some Account of the Life, Writings, and Character of the Author

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B. Dod, at the Bible and Key in Ave-Mary Lane near Stationers-Hall, 1743 - Authors, Greek - 189 pages
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Page 138 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths : their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wit's end.
Page 162 - And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience ; .and patience, experience; and experience, hope: and hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
Page 131 - Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams, or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Page 28 - O'er my dim Eyes a Darkness hung; My Ears with hollow Murmurs rung. In dewy Damps my Limbs were chill'd; My Blood with gentle Horrors thrill'd; My feeble Pulse forgot to play, I fainted, sunk, and dy'd away.
Page 173 - I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me : and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me : my judgment was as a robe and a diadem. I was eyes to the blind, and feet was I to the lame. I was a father to the poor : and the cause which I knew not, I searched out.
Page 165 - She crieth at the gates, at the entry of the city, at the coming in at the doors. Unto you, 0 men, I call ; and my voice is to the sons of man.
Page 127 - He bowed the heavens also, and came down : and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly: yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.
Page 159 - That it should come to this! But two months dead: nay, not so much, not two: So excellent a king; that was, to this, Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother That he might not beteem the winds of heaven Visit her face too roughly.
Page 165 - Both turn'd, and under open sky ador'd The GOD that made both sky, air, earth, and heav'n Which they beheld, the moon's resplendent globe, And starry pole. Thou also mad'st the night, Maker Omnipotent, and thou the day...

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