The Typewriter Girl

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Street & Smith, 1900 - 248 pages
 

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User Review  - stephxsu - LibraryThing

This was a read for my 19th-century Victorian lit class, and I wouldn't have picked it up otherwise, and for good reason. The voice of the first-person main character feels too forced, and the pacing ... Read full review

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Page 213 - Hold thou the good : define it well : For fear divine Philosophy Should push beyond her mark, and be Procuress to the Lords of Hell.
Page 33 - In witness whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of June in the year of grace eighteen hundred and ninety-one.
Page 17 - Three clerks (male), in seedy black coats, the eldest with hair the color of a fox's, went on chaffing one another for two minutes after I closed the door, with ostentatious unconsciousness of my insignificant presence. . . . The youngest, after a while, wheeled around on his high stool and broke out with the chivalry of his class and age. "Well, what's your business?
Page 19 - ... down. I am slender, and, I will venture to say, if not pretty, at least interesting looking. 'How many words a minute?' he asked after a long pause. I stretched the truth as far as its elasticity would permit. 'Ninetyseven,' I answered . . . The eldest clerk, with the foxy head, wheeled around, and took his turn to stare. He had hairy hands and large goggle-eyes ... I detected an undercurrent of double meaning ... I felt disagreeably like Esther in the presence of Ahasuerus - a fat and oily Ahasuerus...
Page 164 - Poor soul," whispered Lady Penelope to Tyrrel ; " we know what we are, we know not what we may be. — And now, Mr. Tyrrel, I have been your sibyl to guide you through this Elysium of ours, I think, in reward, I deserve a little confidence in return.
Page 24 - ... I afterwards expanded on the typewriter in the anteroom. Ahasuerus was graciously pleased to like me. I found favor, also, in the eyes of the Grand Vizier; he was good enough to say my work was intelligent. I had doubts in my own mind as to the Vizier's competence to form an opinion on this head ; but was he not a man — a vote-wielding citizen, empowered to take his share (vicariously) in the counsels of the nation? and was not I but a shorthand and typewriter (female)? I bowed to the wisdom...
Page 22 - I had proved myself fittest by the mere act of survival. . . . The sole remaining question was, Could I adapt myself to my environment? If so, I had fulfilled the whole gospel of Darwinism.
Page 18 - Well, what's your business?" My voice trembled a little, but I mustered up courage and spoke. "I have called about your advertisement. ..." He eyed me up and down. I am slender, and, I will venture to say, if not pretty, at least interesting looking. "How many words a minute?
Page 92 - Thank you, Mr. Atkins," when the band begins to play, The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play— O, it's "Thank you, Mr. Atkins," when the band begins to play. —R. Kipling circa 1900 Scott drank stinging uisqueplus and glowered across the smoky tavern. He was a hard, stocky man, with thick gray-shot brown hair and the scar of an old wound...
Page 19 - ... asked after a long pause. I stretched the truth as far as its elasticity would permit. "Ninety-seven," I answered. . . . The eldest clerk, with the foxy head, wheeled around, and took his turn to stare. He had hairy hands and large goggleeyes. ... I detected an undercurrent of double meaning. . . . I felt disagreeably like Esther in the presence of Ahasuerus— a fat and oily Ahasuerus of fifty. . . . He perused me up and down with his small pig's eyes, as if he were buying a horse, scrutinizing...

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