Evolutionary Epistemology, Rationality, and the Sociology of Knowledge

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Open Court Publishing, 1987 - Philosophy - 475 pages
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"Bartley and Radnitzky have done the philosophy of knowledge a tremendous service. Scholars now have a superb and up-to-date presentation of the fundamental ideas of evolutionary epistemology."
--Philosophical Books

 

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The first eight chapters (half the book) contain major essays on evolutionary epistemology including two each by Karl Popper and Donald Campbell. A breath-taking contribution from Gunter Wachterhauser offers some exciting ideas about the evolutionary origin of vision as an aid to seeking light for photosynthesis. Gerhard Vollmer's chapter refutes various relativistic conclusions that are often drawn from Godel's theorems.
One of Campbell's chapters drew attention to the vogue of evolutionary scholarship last century but evolutionary epistemology had to be rediscovered this century after a lapse of some decades. Bartley described how this remarkable disappearance can be attributed to the rise of a particular philosophy of physics to dominate the philosophy of science. His ideas are addressed in the second part of the book on rationality and the limits of criticism.
The collection would gain from an introductory chapter to orientate the reader to the main themes of the book which will only be apparent to those who are familiar with the work of Popper and Bartley.
 

Contents

II
7
III
47
IV
91
V
115
VI
121
VII
139
VIII
157
IX
163
XIII
223
XIV
253
XV
269
XVI
279
XVII
313
XVIII
343
XIX
345
XX
401

X
203
XI
205
XII
217
XXI
423
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About the author (1987)

Popper is deceased. He is widely acclaimed as one of the greatest philosophers and most influential thinkers of our time.

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