Good Governance Reform Agenda in Pakistan: Current Challenges

Front Cover
Nova Publishers, 2007 - Political Science - 244 pages
Pakistan, after fifty eight years of existence, was faced with a governance crisis. Certain significant political and economic developments in the international environment were having a profound impact on the country. Pakistan was faced with complex and daunting challenges threatening its stability. These challenges were: regional dynamics after the launch of the 'Global War on Terrorism' by the USA; democratisation, the universal quest for re-inventing government, the apparent triumph of capitalism, and the paradigm shift towards sustainable development. This book presents political, economic, legal and public issues during the reformation era of Pakistan's decentralising government.
 

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I took this as my refernce in CSS exams...thanks to author :-)

Contents

Introduction
1
Reform of the Political Economy
33
Reform of the Political System
63
Reform of the Parliament
81
Decentralization and Devolution Reforms
97
Reform of the Legal and Judicial System
115
The Reform of Public Services
129
Epilogue
221
General Bibliography
227
Index
229
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Page 14 - Democracy (whether capitalistic or socialistic is not at issue here) is the only system that can successfully cope with the changing demands of contemporary civilization.
Page 14 - The wider access to information has been healthy for development, scientific and professional collaboration, and many other activities. The wide linkages now facilitated can also help pull the world's people closer together. Media images of human suffering have motivated people to express their concern and their solidarity with those in distant places by contributing to relief efforts and by demanding explanations and action from governments.. The media's influence on the shaping of foreign policy...
Page 4 - States retain sovereignty, but governments have suffered an erosion in their authority. They are less able, for example, to control the transborder movement of money or information. They face the pressures of globalization at one level and of grassroots movements and, in some cases, demands for devolution if not secession at another. In the extreme case, public order may disintegrate and civil institutions collapse in the face of rampant violence, as in Liberia and Somalia.

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