Abbé Mouret's Transgression

Front Cover
Mondial, 2005 - Fiction - 300 pages
0 Reviews
Serge Mouret, the younger son of Francois Mouret (see La Conquete de Plassans), was ordained to the priesthood and appointed Cure of Les Artaud, a squalid village in Provence, to whose degenerate inhabitants he ministered with small encouragement. He had inherited the family taint of the Rougon-Macquarts, which in him took the same form as in the case of his mother-a morbid religious enthusiasm bordering on hysteria. Brain fever followed, and bodily recovery left the priest without a mental past. Dr. Pascal Rougon, his uncle, hoping to save his reason, removed him from his accustomed surroundings and left him at the Paradou, the neglected demesne of a ruined mansion-house near Les Artaud, where he was nursed by Albine, niece of the caretaker. The Abbe fell in love with Albine, and, oblivious of his vows, broke them... (J. G. Patterson)"
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

II
1
III
5
IV
11
V
14
VI
19
VII
24
VIII
29
IX
33
XXVI
132
XXVII
146
XXVIII
154
XXIX
163
XXX
171
XXXI
176
XXXII
179
XXXIII
183

X
38
XI
40
XII
44
XIII
60
XIV
65
XV
76
XVI
84
XVII
89
XVIII
93
XIX
97
XX
99
XXI
103
XXII
106
XXIII
112
XXIV
119
XXV
127
XXXIV
191
XXXV
198
XXXVI
202
XXXVII
212
XXXVIII
218
XXXIX
225
XL
237
XLI
253
XLII
257
XLIII
261
XLIV
269
XLV
272
XLVI
278
XLVII
282
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - No ordinance of Man shall override The settled laws of Nature and of God ; Not written these in pages of a book, Nor were they framed to-day, nor yesterday; We know not whence they are ; but this we know, That they from all eternity have been, And shall to all eternity endure.

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Zola was the spokesperson for the naturalist novel in France and the leader of a school that championed the infusion of literature with new scientific theories of human development drawn from Charles Darwin (see Vol. 5) and various social philosophers. The theoretical claims for such an approach, which are considered simplistic today, were outlined by Zola in his Le Roman Experimental (The Experimental Novel, 1880). He was the author of the series of 20 novels called The Rougon-Macquart, in which he attempted to trace scientifically the effects of heredity through five generations of the Rougon and Macquart families. Three of the outstanding volumes are L'Assommoir (1877), a study of alcoholism and the working class; Nana (1880), a story of a prostitute who is a femme fatale; and Germinal (1885), a study of a strike at a coal mine. All gave scope to Zola's gift for portraying crowds in turmoil. Today Zola's novels have been appreciated by critics for their epic scope and their visionary and mythical qualities. He continues to be immensely popular with French readers. His newspaper article "J'Accuse," written in defense of Alfred Dreyfus, launched Zola into the public limelight and made him the political conscience of his country.

Bibliographic information