Writings in General Linguistics

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Oxford University Press, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 336 pages
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Ferdinand de Saussure's Cours de linguistique g�n�rale was posthumously composed by his students from the notes they had made at his lectures. The book became one of the most influential works of the twentieth century, giving direction to modern linguistics and inspiration to literary and cultural theory. Before he died Saussure told friends he was writing up the lectures himself but no evidence of this was found. Eighty years later in 1996 a manuscript in Saussure's hand was discovered in the orangerie of his family house in Geneva. This proved to be the missing original of the great work. It is published now in English for the first time in an edition edited by Simon Bouquet and Rudolf Engler, and translated and introduced by Carol Sanders and Matthew Pires, all leading Saussure scholars. The book includes an earlier discovered manuscript on the philosophy of language, Saussure's own notes for lectures, and a comprehensive bibliography of major work on Saussure from 1970 to 2004.

It is remarkable that for eighty years the understanding of Saussure's thought has depended on an incomplete and non-definitive text, the sometimes aphoristic formulations of which gave rise to many creative interpretations and arguments for and against Saussure. Did he, or did he not, see language as a-social and a-historical? Did he, or did he not, rule out the study of speech within linguistics? Was he a reductionist? These disputes and many others can now be resolved on the basis of the work now published. This reveals new depth and subtetly in Saussure's thoughts on the nature and complex workings of language, particularly his famous binary oppositions between form and meaning, the sign and what is signified, and language (langue) and its performance (parole).
 

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Contents

28
3
The object of linguistics
6
Phonetics and morphology
13
Identify and difference 5a Sound and meaning 5b IdentityEntities
14
5C IdentityMarch of ideas
15
Morphology and form 6a Reflections on the procedures of the linguist
16
6b Morphologytat de langue 6C Form 6d Difference and lack of difference
18
6e FormVocal figure
19
Signs and negativity
47
On the negativity of synonymy
48
Question of synonymy continued
49
On essence
50
New miscellaneous notes from the Orangery manuscripts
62
Titles marked with an asterisk are Saussures All others have been added by the editors of this
65
Aphorisms from the Engler edition
81
Early documents from the Engler edition ୨୦
89

Phonetic change and semantic change
22
Semiology
24
Note to the reader
25
Essence etc Instantaneous and phonetic viewpoints State
27
Iob The cacuminal n rule II Different signs
30
Life of language
32
categories
33
rules
34
Synchronic phonetic rules
35
Features of rules for synchronic phonetics
37
Actual parole and potential parole
38
Parallelism
39
Alternation
40
Negativity and difference 20a Negativity and difference I
41
Identification relative values point of view
42
Signs and signification 22a Phonetics and morphology
43
22b Fundamental principle of semiology
45
Literal and figurative meaning
46
Distinction between literature philology linguistics
117
Critique of the divisions in use in scientific grammars
135
Status and motus
156
On the difficulties of terminology in linguistics
165
Lingustic entitities
183
Event state analogy
191
Note on discourse from the Orangery manuscripts
197
A Saussure Bibliography 19702004 by Matthew Pires
241
Index
277
Varia 34
285
36
298
38
299
39
308
40
320
41
326
Index
329
54
330
Copyright

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About the author (2006)


Ferdinand de Saussure (1857-1913) was professor at the University of Geneva (1901-13). M�moire sur le syst�me primitif des voyelles dans les langues indo-europ�ennes was published in 1879 but his Cours de linguistique g�n�rale was posthumously compiled from his students' lecture notes and did not appear until 1916. "It became," wrote Giulio Lepschy, "arguably the most influential work of linguistics of the twentieth century, and can be considered the foundation stone of structuralism."

Simon Bouquet is President of the Institut Ferdinand de Saussure in Switzerland. He is a researcher at the University of Berne and lectures at the University of Paris. He has made the manuscript texts of Saussure better known through critical editions: his and Rudolph Engler's edition of the �crits de linguistique g�n�rale is frequently referred to in this volume.

Rudolf Engler (1930-2003) taught for many years at the University of Berne. He wrote prolifically on Saussure, making frequent contributions to the Cahiers Ferdinand de Saussure. He is known for his comparative critical edition of the student notes for Saussure's lectures on general linguistics and for co-editing the �crits de linguistique g�n�rale with Simon Bouquet.

Translators

Carol Sanders is Emeritus Professor of French at the University of Surrey. She was the founding president of the Association for French Language Studies and has lectured in French at universities in Great Britain, Australia, and the West Indies. She is the editor of The French Language Today (1993), and the Cambridge Companion to Saussure (2004) both published by Cambridge University Press.

Matthew Pires is Lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Franche-Comt�, and a visiting lecturer at the University of London Institute in Paris. In addition to his work on Saussure, his research concerns sociolinguistic approaches to onomastics and address forms in writing.

Peter Figueroa studied philosophy in Italy, Belgium and France before doing a doctorate in sociology at the LSE. He was a Research Officer in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of Oxford and has lectured at the Australian National University, the University of Southampton, and at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica.

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