Rioting in America

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Indiana University Press, 1999 - History - 240 pages
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"... a sweeping, analytical synethsis of collective violence from the colonial experience to the present." —American Studies

"Gilje has written ‘the book’ on rioting throughout American history." —The Historian

"... a thorough, illuminating, and at times harrowing account of man’s inhumanity to man." —William and Mary Quarterly

"... fulfills its title's promise as an encyclopedic study... an impressive accomplishment and required reading for anyone interested in America's contentious past." —Journal of the Early Republic

"Gilje has written a thought-provoking survey of the social context of American riots and popular disorders from the Colonial period to the late 20th century.... a must read for anyone interested in riots." —Choice

In this wide-ranging survey of rioting in America, Paul A. Gilje argues that we cannot fully comprehend the history of the United States without an understanding of the impact of rioting. Exploring the rationale of the American mob brings to light the grievances that motivate its behavior and the historical circumstances that drive the choices it makes. Gilje’s unusual lens makes for an eye-opening view of the American people and their history.

 

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Contents

WHY STUDY RIOTS?
1
DISORDER AND ORDER IN COLONIAL AMERICA
12
RIOTING IN THE REVOLUTION
35
DEMOCRACY UNLEASHED
60
THE TRAGEDY OF RACE
87
BRINK OF ANARCHY
116
DEMOCRACY ENTRENCHED
144
EPILOGUE
177
COUNTING RIOTS
183
INDEX
233
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Paul Gilje is a George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the Department of History at the University of Oklahoma. He holds an MA and PhD from Brown University and has held fellowships at Johns Hopkins University and Washington University, St Louis. Gilje is the author of The Road to Mobocracy: Popular Disorder in New York City, 1763 1834; Riots in America; Liberty on the Waterfront: Society and Culture of the American Maritime World in the Age of Revolution, 1750 1850; and The Making of the American Republic, 1763 1815. Liberty on the Waterfront received the 2004 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Best Book Prize and the 2004 North American Society for Oceanic History John Lyman Book Award in the category of United States Maritime History. Professor Gilje has organized an adult civics program in the state of Oklahoma, consulted for museums, edited several books and lectured widely in Europe and America. Throughout his career he has a sustained interest in how common people have been affected by the larger events of history.

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