Hawaii's Story

Front Cover
Lee and Shepard, 1898 - Hawaii - 409 pages
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DarthDeverell - LibraryThing

Part autobiography, part political history, Queen Lili‘uokalani’s Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen Liliuokalani tells her story and that of Hawai‘i from her youth through the time of her publication ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Michael.Bradham - LibraryThing

“Lunalilo Home for aged and indigent Hawaiians… It is well managed, and its inmates are happy and contented, so much so, indeed, that they often conduct themselves as if youth and hope were still ... Read full review

Contents

I
III
8
IV
14
V
20
VI
28
VII
33
VIII
41
IX
54
XXX
183
XXXI
189
XXXII
196
XXXIII
200
XXXIV
206
XXXV
211
XXXVI
216
XXXVII
218

X
59
XI
67
XII
74
XIII
77
XIV
84
XV
92
XVI
98
XVII
104
XVIII
109
XIX
114
XX
119
XXI
126
XXII
133
XXIII
140
XXIV
145
XXV
149
XXVI
158
XXVII
162
XXVIII
169
XXIX
175
XXXVIII
224
XXXIX
235
XL
241
XLI
250
XLII
260
XLIV
265
XLV
271
XLVI
276
XLVII
287
XLVIII
293
XLIX
298
L
303
LI
311
LII
320
LIII
333
LIV
339
LV
347
LVI
352
LVII
356
LVIII
364

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Common terms and phrases

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Page 387 - Now, to avoid any collision of armed forces, and perhaps the loss of life, I do under this protest, and impelled by said force, yield my authority until such time as the Government of the United States...
Page 397 - Congress, all the military, civil, and judicial powers exercised by the officers of the existing government of the same shall be vested in such person or persons and shall be exercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct for maintaining and protecting the inhabitants of Louisiana in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and religion.
Page 397 - The municipal legislation of the Hawaiian Islands, not enacted for the fulfillment of the treaties so extinguished, and not inconsistent with this joint resolution nor contrary to the Constitution of the United States nor to any existing treaty of the United States, shall remain in force until the Congress of the United States shall otherwise determine.
Page 397 - States the absolute fee and ownership of all public, government, or crown lands, public buildings or edifices, ports, harbors, military equipment, and all other public property of every kind and description belonging to the government of the Hawaiian Islands, together with every right and appurtenance thereunto appertaining...
Page 370 - O, it is excellent To have a giant's strength ; but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant.
Page 396 - WHEREAS the Government of the Republic of Hawaii having, in due form, signified its consent, in the manner provided by its constitution, to cede absolutely and without reserve to the United States...
Page 398 - The present convention shall be ratified by both contracting parties in accordance with their constitutional procedure, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible. In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the convention both in the English and Spanish languages and have thereunto affixed their seals.
Page 398 - The President shall appoint five commissioners, at least two of whom shall be residents of the Hawaiian Islands, who shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, recommend to Congress such legislation concerning the Hawaiian Islands as they shall deem necessary or proper.
Page 398 - There shall be no further immigration of Chinese into the Hawaiian Islands, except upon such conditions as are now or may hereafter be allowed by the laws of the United States; and no Chinese, by reason of anything herein contained, shall be allowed to enter the United States from the Hawaiian Islands.
Page 395 - Plenipotentiary, His Excellency John L. Stevens, has caused United States troops to be landed at Honolulu, and declared that he would support the said Provisional Government.

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