Maryland Weather Service, Volume 1

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1899 - Maryland
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Page 273 - A red flag with a black center indicates that a storm of marked violence is expected . The pennants displayed with the flags indicate the direction of the wind: red, easterly (from northeast to south); white, westerly (from southwest to north).
Page 316 - Within is a country that may have the prerogative over the most pleasant places of Europe, Asia, Africa, or America, for large and pleasant navigable rivers: heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for mans habitation being of our constitutions, were it fully manured and inhabited by industrious people.
Page 326 - These observations refer principally to the summer, though they affect spring and autumn nearly in the same ratio. 5. The moon's change, first quarter, full, and...
Page 335 - War be, and he hereby is, authorized and required to provide for taking meteorological observations at the military stations in the interior of the continent and at other points in the States and Territories of the United States, and for giving notice on the northern lakes and on the seacoast, by magnetic telegraph and marine signals, of the approach and force of storms.
Page 324 - Carolina, and was most violent there.* As to the reason of this, I can only give you my conjectures. Suppose a great tract of country, land and sea, to wit, Florida and the Bay of Mexico, to have clear weather for several days, and to be heated by the sun, and its air thereby exceedingly rarefied. Suppose the country northeastward, as Pennsylvania, New England, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland, to be at the same time covered with clouds, and its air chilled and condensed. The rarefied air being lighter...
Page 316 - The temperature of this countrie doth agree well with English constitutions being once seasoned to the country. Which appeared by this, that though by many occasions our people fell sicke; yet did they recover by very small meanes and continued in health, though there were other great causes, not only to have made them sicke, but even to end their daies, etc.
Page 324 - ... place of that by the next and so on to the door. So the water in a long sluice or mill-race being stopped by a gate is at rest like the air in a calm, but as soon as you open the gate at one end to let it out the water next...
Page 326 - The nearer to midday or noon these phases of the moon happen, the more foul or wet weather may be expected during the next seven days. 4. The space for this calculation occupies from ten in the forenoon to two in the afternoon. These observations refer principally to the summer, though they affect spring and autumn nearly in the same ratio.
Page 326 - The nearer the time of the moon's change, first quarter, full, and last quarter, is to midnight, the fairer will the weather be during the seven days following. 2. The space for this calculation occupies from ten at night till two next morning.
Page 320 - We have frequently, along this North American coast, storms from the northeast, which blow violently sometimes three or four days. Of these I have had a very singular opinion some years, viz. that, though the course of the wind is from northeast to southwest, yet the course of the storm is from southwest to northeast; that is, the air is in violent motion in Virginia before it moves in Connecticut, and in Connecticut before it moves at Cape Sable, &,c.