The Politics of Households in Ottoman Egypt: The Rise of the Qazdaglis

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 4, 2002 - History - 220 pages
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In a lucidly argued revisionist study of Ottoman Egypt, first published in 1996, Jane Hathaway challenges the traditional view that Egypt's military elite constituted a revival of the institutions of the Mamluk sultanate. The author contends that the framework within which this elite operated was the household, a conglomerate of patron-client ties that took various forms. In this respect, she argues, Egypt's elite represented a provincial variation on an empire-wide, household-based political culture. The study focuses on the Qazdagli household. Originally, a largely Anatolian contingent within Egypt's Janissary regiment, the Qazdaglis dominated Egypt by the late eighteenth century. Using Turkish and Arabic archival sources, Jane Hathaway sheds light on the manner in which the Qazdaglis exploited the Janissary rank hierarchy, while forming strategic alliances through marriage, commercial partnerships and the patronage of palace eunuchs.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Egypts place in the Ottoman Empire
5
The household
17
Transformations in seventeenth and eighteenthcentury Egyptian military society
32
The emergence and partnership of the Qazdagh and Jalfi households
52
The ascendancy of Ibrahim Kahya alQazdagli and the emergence of the Qazdagli beylicate
88
Marriage alliances and the role of women in the household
109
Property and commercial partnerships
125
The Qazdaghs and the Chief Black Eunuch
139
Conclusions
165
Glossary
174
Bibliography
180
Index
190
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