Statistics of Telegraphy

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Waterlow and sons, 1872 - Telegraph - 121 pages
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Belgian expenses per telegram, interior and international traffic / average cost, product, profit and lose per telegram in European countries / list ofsubmarine cables.
 

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Page 52 - ... Hope, New Zealand, the Andamans, Burmah, &c., &c., which, although comparatively unproductive, would yet, to a government with a monopoly, become feeders to an extent which in the aggregate would be at least selfsupporting. No private company can afford this luxury. It follows, then, that Governments have every advantage in their favour, every possible reason in the interest of good government and substantial benefit to the State, to reduce all telegraphy to the point of being simply a self-supporting...
Page 52 - I venture to say that these are points which never leave the minds of directors of private telegraph companies. The increase of inland traffic decreases the cost of working both internal and international telegrams. Private companies obtain no benefit from this; governments obtain all the benefit. It is established that lowering the tariff upon international messages diminishes the revenue directly derived from this class of correspondence, but it increases the traffic; and it is certain that the...
Page 52 - ... whole community and the amusement of the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Private companies can only obtain a minimum of advantage from the first effect, and none at all from the latter. Government and the State are immediately benefited. Governments can, by unity of management, by simplicity of thorough working, by uniformity of system, effect an enormous amount of saving that cannot be approached under the system of private management. Governments can, by absence of competition, extend the system...
Page 63 - This is by no means a new subject of investigation, but in the present day I am certain it will be instructive to many .amongst the thousands who are now interested in this class of property, to have their attention briefly called to all that has been done to make submarine cables a sound property. Eleven years ago there was a joint committee appointed by the " Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade and Atlantic Telegraphy, to inquire into the construction of submarine cables, together...
Page 49 - ... a length of time ; and after this sacrifice has been made and is about to be rewarded by the gradual increase of revenue to the original point, there will be others ready to bring out rival cables upon the first publication of favourable receipts. There is the danger already referred to that after one company shall have made unproductive lines, they may be opposed upon the most productive sections by a new company with smaller capital. I venture to say that these are points which never leave...
Page 52 - ... whatever. All the increase of telegraphy directly and certainly stimulates commercial activity, increases the wealth of a nation by multiplying transactions, enlarging incomes, thereby promoting a larger taxable surface for the benefit of the whole community and the amusement of the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Private companies can only obtain a minimum of advantage from the first effect, and none at all from the latter. Government and the State are immediately benefited. Governments can, by...
Page 49 - I regret that I cannot think of any reason which should influence the directors of private companies to reduce their tariffs beyond the single one of expediency. The foregoing pages prove conclusively, ' That every reduction of tariff led to diminution of the net product.
Page 47 - ... increase of deficit of net product only slight, with a tendency to diminish, I would submit to the Telegraph Department of India whether it might not be worth while to try a bold effort to introduce telegraphy into the habits of the Indian community. I am of opinion this will never be done unless its tariff is reduced to some moderate standard represented by some small current coin, such as half a rupee. The lines exist; the capital is expended; the stations are opened ; the work can be greatly...
Page 52 - ... simplicity of through working, by uniformity of system, effect an enormous amount of saving that cannot be approached under the system of private management. Governments can, by absence of competition, extend the system to such points as the Mauritius, Cape of Good Hope, New Zealand, the Andamans, Burmah, &c., &c., which, although comparatively unproductive, would yet, to a Government with a monopoly, become feeders to an extent which, in the aggregate, would be at least selfsupporting. No private...
Page 8 - Company, read before the Statistical Society, June 18, 1872.) 1. The unavoidable accompaniments to private and joint-stock enterprise produce a series of obstacles to cheapness and progress that only Government control can overcome. 2. It is this commercial activity which every State should encourage, as certain to add to the general prosperity and wealth-producing...

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