Information Technology in Government: Britain and America

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, 1999 - Computers - 208 pages
0 Reviews
This book situates information technology at the centre of public policy and management. IT is now a vital part of any government organisation, opening new policy windows and enabling a vast range of tasks to be carried out faster and more efficiently. But it has also introduced new problems and challenges. Four in-depth case studies demonstrate how information systems have become inextricably linked with the core tasks of governmental organisations. The key government departments examined are:
* the Inland Revenue Service and Social Security Administration in the US
* the Inland Revenue and Benefits Agency in the UK

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

References to this book

Cyberculture: The Key Concepts
David Bell
No preview available - 2004
All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)


Patrick Dunleavy is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has authored and edited numerous books on political science theory, British politics and urban politics, as well as more than 50 articles in professional journals. His
publications include: the series Developments in British Politics (co-authored, Eighth edition, forthcoming 2006); Democracy, Bureaucracy and Public Choice (Harvester-Wheatsheaf, 1992); Theories of the State: The Politics of Liberal Democracy (Palgrave, 1987). He also edited the journals Political
Studies and Political Studies Review for the UK Political Studies Association for six years (1999-2005), with Jane Tinkler and others.
Helen Margetts is a Professor at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, before which she was Director of the School of Public Policy at UCL. Previously she worked as a lecturer at Birkbeck College (1994-99), a researcher at the LSE (1990-94), and as a systems analyst and computer
programmer in the private sector (1984-89). She is a political scientist specialising in the implications for government of use of the Internet and related information technologies. She has published widely in this area including (with Patrick Dunleavy) two studies of Government on the Web for the
UK National Audit Office (1999 and 2002), the book Information Technology in Government (Routledge, 1999) and a forthcoming book with Christopher Hood Tools of Government in the Digital Age (Palgrave, 2006)

Bibliographic information