The Anglo-Latin satirical poets and epigrammatists of the twelfth century: The Anglo-Latin satirical poets of the twelfth century

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Thomas Wright
Longman, 1872 - Epigrams, Latin - 392 pages
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Page 10 - CUM TRITICO. Ascribed to THOMAS NETTER, of WALDEN, Provincial of the Carmelite Order in England, and Confessor to King Henry the Fifth. Edited by the Rev. WW SHIRLEY, MA, Tutor and late Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford.
Page 13 - Rome, in the year 681, and continues the history down to the subjugation of Wales by Edward I., about the year 1282.
Page 14 - While Bishop of St. Asaph, he zealously defended his brother prelates from the attacks of those who censured the bishops for their neglect of duty. He maintained that it was no part of a bishop's functions to appear in the pulpit, and that his time might be more profitably spent, and his dignity better maintained, in the performance of works of a higher character. Among those who thought differently were the Lollards, and against their general doctrines the " Represser
Page 32 - FAC-SIMILES of NATIONAL MANUSCRIPTS, from WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR to QUEEN ANNE, selected under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, and Photozincographed, by Command of Her Majesty, by Colonel SIR HENRY JAMES, RE, Director of the Ordnance Survey. Price, each Part, with translations and notes, double foolscap folio, 16s.
Page 20 - Edited by JOHN GLOVER, MA, Vicar of Brading, Isle of Wight, formerly Librarian of Trinity College, Cambridge. 1865. These two treatises, though they cannot rank as independent narratives, are nevertheless valuable as careful abstracts of previous historians, especially " Le Livere de Reis de Engletere.
Page 17 - Year Books " contain reports in Norman-French of cases argued and decided in the Courts of Common Law. They may be considered to a great extent as the " lex non scripta " of England, and have been held in the highest veneration by the ancient sages of the law, and were received by them as the repositories of the first recorded judgments and dicta of the great legal luminaries of past ages.
Page 28 - ANCIENT LAWS AND INSTITUTES OF WALES ; comprising Laws supposed to be enacted by Howel the Good ; modified by subsequent Regulations under the Native Princes, prior to the Conquest by Edward the First ; and anomalous Laws, consisting principally of Institutions which, by the Statute of Ruddlan, were admitted to continue in force. With an English Translation of the Welsh Text. To which are added, a few Latin Transcripts, containing Digests of the Welsh Laws, principally of the Dimetian Code. With...
Page 16 - Walsingham's work is printed from MS. VII. in the Arundel Collection in the College of Arms, London, a manuscript of the fifteenth century, collated with MS. 13 E.

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