Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Volumes 7-8

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Seismological Society of America, 1917 - Earthquakes
 

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Page 120 - Recorded by a single seismograph, or by some seismographs of the same model, but not by several seismographs of different kinds ; the shock felt by an experienced observer.
Page 71 - Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship, which grinds you stuff of any degree of fineness ; but, nevertheless, what you get out depends on what you put in ; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat-flour from peascods, so pages of formulae will not get a definite result out of loose data.
Page 90 - General awakening of those asleep ; general ringing of house bells ; oscillation of chandeliers ; stopping of pendulum clocks ; visible agitation of trees and shrubs ; some startled persons leave their dwellings. VII. Strong shock : Overthrow of movable objects ; fall of plaster ; ringing of church bells ; general panic, without damage to buildings. VIII. Very strong shock : Fall of chimneys ; cracks in walls of buildings. IX. Extremely strong shock : Partial or total destruction of some buildings....
Page 44 - Microseismic shock. — Recorded by a single seismograph or by seismographs of the same model, but not by several seismographs of different kinds; the shock felt by an experienced observer.
Page 126 - Recorded by several seismographs ol different kinds ; felt by a small number of persons at rest. III. Very feeble shock : Felt by several persons at rest ; strong enough for the direction or duration to be appreciable. IV. Feeble shock : Felt by persons in motion ; disturbances of movable objects, doors, windows ; creaking of ceilings. V. Shock of moderate intensity : Felt generally by every one ; disturbance of furniture, beds, &c.
Page 120 - Shock of moderate intensity : Felt generally by everyone ; disturbance of furniture, beds, etc. ; ringing of swinging bells.
Page 104 - The first shock was on November 1 between 9:15 and 9:30 AM This was the most severe and lasted several seconds; it shook goods from the shelves and caused landslides for several miles along the hills. We have had on an average about three shocks every twenty-four hours since, but lighter.
Page 8 - Fairly strong shock: general awakening of those asleep; general ringing of house bells ; oscillation of chandeliers ; stopping of pendulum clocks ; visible agitation of trees and shrubs ; some startled persons leave their dwellings. VII. Strong shock: overthrow of movable objects; fall of plaster: ringing of church bells ; general panic, without damage to buildings. VIII.
Page 67 - In the absence of the President the meeting was called to order by the Secretary at 7:05 pm, and Dr.
Page 35 - Every night flames of fire were observed streaming from the mountain; and the eruption which attended them, did no small damage to the inhabitants of the Lower Ostrog. Since that year no flames have been seen; but the mountain emits a constant smoke. The same phenomenon is also observed upon another mountain, called Tabaet Skinskain.

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