History of United States Naval Operations in World War II: New Guinea and the Marianas, March 1944 - August 1944

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University of Illinois Press, Nov 1, 2001 - History - 488 pages
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The University of Illinois Press continues its paperback release of Samuel Eliot Morison's panoramic fifteen-volume naval history with three volumes that chronicle the war in the Pacific from May 1942 through May 1944. This new edition will be issued in increments of three volumes per season through Spring 2003.Morison's genius for capturing the flash and fire and the pathos of combat infuses his narrative with an immense vitality and suspense. This is not an official history, in the ordinary sense of that term, but Morison's history, a gripping, face-to-face encounter with the human drama of war.Volume 4: Coral Sea, Midway and Submarine Actions, May 1942 -- August 1942 details the American victory in the Coral Sea and the U.S. Navy's stunning defeat of a far superior Japanese force at Midway, as well as the events leading up to the six-month struggle at Guadalcanal. This volume also provides a richly detailed look at the first-year exploits of the Silent Service: the fledgling American submarine corps in the Pacific. Morison supplements his firsthand experience of American operations and access to Allied documents with critical information from the Japanese side.
 

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Contents

The Pacific Strategy for 1944
3
2 Japanese Counterstrategy
10
Submarine Patrols December 1943July 1944
15
Fast Carrier Strikes on Palau Hollandia and Truk 22 March30 April 1944
27
2 Strikes on Hollandia WakdeSarmi and Truk 30 March30 April
34
The Southwest Pacif1c Organization
45
2 Southwest Pacific Specialties
49
Dutch New Guinea and the Reckless Plan
59
4 PHELPSS Adventures 1621 June
210
Battle of the Philippine Sea Preliminaries 3 May18 June 1944
213
2 The Japanese Submarine Offensive 14 May4 July
222
3 Forward to Decisive Victory 1215 June
231
4 Strikes on Iwo and Chichi Jima 1511 June
237
5 Feeling Each Other Out 1518 June
240
Battle of the Philippine Sea the Action 1920 June
257
2 The Submarines Contribution 19 June
278

2 The Enemys Situation
65
The Hollandia Operation 21 April6 June 1944
68
2 Battle of the Driniumor River 1 June10 August
71
3 Tanahmerah Bay 22 April6 June
74
4 Humboldt Bay 22 April6 June
79
5 Japanese Reaction and Retreat 22 April17 May
88
WakdeSarmi May 1944
91
Biak 27 May1 June 1944
103
2 Zday at Bosnik 27 May
108
3 The Drive for the Airfields
114
The Japanese Reaction to Biak Operation KON 27 May13 June 1944
117
2 First Reinforcement Attempt 31 May4 June
119
3 Battle off Biak 89 June
125
4 AGo Cancels KON Biak Secured 1022 June
131
Noemfoor and Sansapor 2 July3 September 1944
134
2 Sausapor 30 July31 August
140
3 New Guinea Epilogue
144
Preliminary Poundings and Final Plans FebruaryApril 1944
149
2 First Call 23 February
154
3 Plans Problems and Procedures
157
4 Japanese Preparations to Defend Saipan
167
Approach and Bombardment 10 May14 June 1944
170
2 Fast Carrier Air Strikes 1113 June
174
3 Prelanding Bombardments 1315 June
179
4 The Underwater Demolition Teams20
183
Saipan 1521 June 1944
186
2 Beachhead Secured 1511 June
199
3 Shore Advances and Counterattacks 1121 June
206
3 Moving Westward 2000 June 190500 June 20
282
4 The Air Battle of 20 June
288
Battle of the Philippine Sea Conclusion 2024 June
305
2 Operation Jocko 24 June
311
3 Victory
313
4 Plane Losses
319
Saipan Secured 21 June9 July 1944
322
2 The Struggle for Mount Tapotchau 2126 June
330
3 The North End Cleared 27 June9 July
334
4 Conclusion
337
Logistics for the Marianas
341
2 Food and Fuel
343
3 Ammunition
346
4 Shipping and Stretchers
347
The Fight for Tinian 24 July1 August 1944
351
2 Jday 24 July
360
3 Tinian Taken 25 July2 August
364
Guam Recovered JuneAugust 1944
371
2 First Phase of the Assault 2128 July
382
3 Island Secured 29 July10 August
398
Hollandia Task Organization
403
Naval Forces Engaged in the Capture of Saipan and Tinian
407
Forces Engaged in the Battle of the Philippine Sea
412
2 Japanese Forces in Operation AGo 120 June
416
Naval Forces Engaged in the Capture of Guam 21 July10 August 1944
418
Index
421
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About the author (2001)

Samuel Eliot Morison was born in Boston in 1887. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. He served as the university's official historian and wrote a three-volume history of the institution, the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. He also was an accomplished sailor who retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral. In preparing for his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies of Christopher Columbus and John Paul Jones, Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1941) and John Paul Jones: A Sailor's Biography (1952) he took himself out of the study and onto the high seas, where he traced the voyages of his subjects and "lived" their stories insofar as possible. When it came time for the U.S. Navy to select an author to write a history of its operations in World War II, Morison was the natural choice for the task. In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts. He was an "American historian" in the fullest sense of the term. He also had a keen appreciation for the larger history of the nation and world, provincial is the last word one would use to describe Morison's writing.

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