The Pink Fairy Book

Front Cover
Andrew Lang
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1897 - Children's stories - 360 pages
2 Reviews
All people in the world tell nursery tales to their children. The Japanese tell them, the Chinese, the Red Indians by their camp fires, the Eskimo in their dark dirty winter huts. The Kaffirs of South Africa tell them, and the modern Greeks, just as the old Egyptians did, when Moses had not been many years rescued out of the bulrushes. The Germans, French, Spanish, Italians, Danes, Highlanders tell them also, and the stories are apt to be like each other everywhere. A child who has read the Blue and Red and Yellow Fairy Books will find some old friends with new faces in the Pink Fairy Book, if he examines and compares. But the Japanese tales will probably be new to the young student; the Tanuki is a creature whose acquaintance he may not have made before.
 

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User Review  - MontglaneChess - LibraryThing

Another one of Andrew Lang’s colorful collections of fairy stories and folk tales, this time diverting from a mostly European collection to include a heavily animal-based collection of Scandinavian ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - xicanti - LibraryThing

A collection of fairy stories and folktales from around the world. This installment of the coloured fairy books does include stories from Japan, Italy, Africa and Spain, but there's a real emphasis on ... Read full review

Contents

I
II
6
III
12
IV
17
V
25
VI
32
VII
39
VIII
46
XX
166
XXI
176
XXII
183
XXIII
192
XXIV
201
XXV
212
XXVI
215
XXVII
222

IX
49
X
68
XI
94
XII
104
XIII
118
XIV
124
XV
135
XVI
140
XVII
146
XVIII
154
XIX
159
XXVIII
231
XXIX
250
XXX
266
XXXI
281
XXXII
289
XXXIII
293
XXXIV
313
XXXV
326
XXXVI
331
XXXVII
348

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Page 32 - THE FLYING TRUNK THERE was once a merchant, who was so rich that he could pave the whole street with gold, and almost have enough left for a little lane.
Page 34 - I shall bring no marriage gift but a story," said he ; and so they parted. But the Princess gave him a sabre, the sheath embroidered with gold pieces, and that was very useful to him. Now he flew away, bought a new dressing-gown, and sat in the forest and made up a story ; it was to be ready by Saturday, and that was not an easy thing. By the time he had finished it Saturday had come. The Sultan and...
Page 359 - Mr. Lang has made a most pleasing and readable romance, full of love and fighting adventures and exciting episodes. There is a quaintness about the recital in keeping with the period and which is an added charm. The story of Joan of Arc has been many times told, but never any more interestingly than in this book." —BOSTON TIMES. " A delightful romance. . . . Mr. Lang has made admirable use of his material and has given us a quaint and stirring tale that is well worth reading.
Page 359 - Orleans ; and it is abundantly clear that the picture is drawn by one who knows the period, not only in its dry, prosaic sequence of battles and marches, but in the spirit and the speech of the time ... a love story hardly less graceful and delicate...
Page 355 - With its exquisite charm of the stories rendered still more attractive by the pretty blue and gold fancy in binding. These fairy tales are the old standard ones that have pleased and enchanted the children for generations, and will be treasured as a classic of English literature.
Page 100 - Where do you come from?" asked the Mice. "And what do you know?" They were dreadfully inquisitive.
Page 359 - ... from the skill with which he has woven into the story of her career as an inspired prophet and leader, little incidents showing her as the simplehearted girl. The hero is supposed to be one of her body-guard, and his sweetheart one of her near friends. Although the Maid is really the central figure, the story of the lovers and the dangers of the hero and the heroine is so skillfully woven in that the book is nothing like a history of France at the time, but is a real romance; and because it is...
Page 357 - THE BLUE POETRY BOOK. Edited by ANDREW LANG. With 12 Plates and 88 Illustrations in the Text by HJ FORD and LANCELOT SPEED. Crown 8vo., 6s. Special Edition, printed on India paper.
Page 35 - Yes, pray let us settle which is the most aristocratic among us," said the matches. ' "No, I don't like talking about myself," said the earthen pipkin; "let us have an evening entertainment! I will begin. I will tell you the kind of things we have all experienced; they are quite easy to understand, and that is what we all like. By the eastern sea and Danish beeches - " ' "That's a nice beginning to make!
Page 102 - Tree !" said the child, and he trod upon the branches till they cracked again under his boots. And the Tree looked at all the blooming flowers and the splendor of the garden, and then looked at itself, and wished it had remained in the dark corner of the garret; it thought of its fresh youth in the wood, of the merry Christmas Eve, and of the little Mice which had listened so pleasantly to the story of Klumpey-Dumpey. "Past! past!

About the author (1897)

Andrew Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland on March 31, 1844. He was a historian, poet, novelist, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion is expressed in his works Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources including his works A History of Scotland (1900-7), James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902), and Sir George Mackenzie (1909). He was one of the most important collectors of folk and fairy tales. His collections of Fairy books, including The Blue Fairy Book, preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time. He died of angina pectoris on July 20, 1912.

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