The Connection Between Geography and History: A Lecture Delivered Before the American Institute of Instruction, at Hartford, Conn., August, 1845

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W.D. Ticknor, 1846 - Geography - 43 pages
 

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Page 20 - When he uttereth his Voice there is a multitude of waters in the heavens, and he causeth the vapours to ascend from the ends of the earth ; he maketh lightnings with rain, and bringeth forth the wind out of his treasures.
Page 13 - It may be pertinacity," said he, at length; " but to my eye these grey hills and all this wild border country have beauties peculiar to themselves. I like the very nakedness of the land ; it has something bold, and stern, and solitary about it. When I have been for some time in the rich scenery about Edinburgh, which is like ornamented garden land, I begin to wish myself back again among my own honest grey hills; and if I did not see the heather at least once a year, I think I should die!
Page 13 - ... but to my eye these grey hills and all this wild border country have beauties peculiar to themselves. I like the very nakedness of the land ; it has something bold, and stern, and solitary about it. When I have been for some time in the rich scenery about Edinburgh, which is like ornamented garden land, I begin to wish myself back again among my own honest grey hills; and if I did not see the heather at least once a year, I think I should die!
Page 21 - Greece is remarkable, among the countries of Europe, for those peculiarities which distinguish Europe itself from the other quarters of the globe ; for the number of its natural divisions, and its extent of sea-coast compared with its surface. Though not so large as Portugal, its extent of sea-coast is greater than that of Italy, and twice as great as that of France. Peloponnesus is so embayed and indented by the sea that it has been aptly likened to the human hand, stretched out, with the fingers...
Page 40 - Pacific there is an extensive region of this kind, of about eight hundred miles in length and six hundred miles in breadth, including the Rocky Mountains which run through it ; a sandy and rocky tract, not capable of supporting a stationary agricultural population, and only to be safely traversed by persons in considerable numbers. This region lies between us and the Oregon territory. Of the validity of our claims to this territory I have not carefully informed myself, but all past history gives...
Page 41 - It may be that our sun is to go down in blood ; that violence is to rend asunder the chain of our union and scatter its links in wild disorder ; that our soil is to be drenched with fraternal blood ; that the pleasant gardens of our prosperity are to be uprooted by the whirlwinds of anarchy, or iron-bound by the polar frost of despotism. It will be so if our material civilization is always to keep far in advance of our mental and moral cultivation; if prosperity is to make us selfish, if wealth is...
Page 22 - Its author must have been familiar with the sea in all its moods, and from childhood "laid his hand upon its mane," like that strong swimmer of our own age, from whom these words are taken, but who, unlike the old Greek bard, drew from the ocean not the spirit of its central repose, but its bitterness, its turbulence and its foam. The attachment of the Greeks to the sea is illustrated by an anecdote which has come down to us, of a Greek islander, who, when he was carried to see the beautiful vale...
Page 12 - But the heather that I have trod upon when living must bloom ower me when I am dead; my heart would sink, and my arm would shrink and wither like fern in the frost, were I to lose sight of my native hills...
Page 22 - States lying near each other were completely isolated by mountain barriers. Hence it came that Greece was occupied by many distinct communities, differing in dialect and in civil and religious institutions, whose struggles and rivalries afforded a constant excitement to the minds of the inhabitants. This explains the fact why the history of Greece is so crowded with events, is so fruitful in political instruction, and is also one reason of the beauty and variety of its literature. Of the various...

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