1793-1802

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Essex institute, 1907 - Salem (Mass.)
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Page 200 - Now in the museum of the Essex Institute, Salem. fine prospect in front, & a gentle descent to a little creek, in which the Gov. kept his Shallop. Tradition says there was a walk to this place with damson trees & grape vines so thick that a person might walk unobserved. These have all been gone for many years. This place was called the Gov. Orchard as he planted early Trees around his house. There is only one Tree left, which bears the Sugar Pear, & by tradition was planted in 1630. It is in front...
Page 415 - The Baptists by attaching themselves to the present administration have gained great success in the US & greater in New England than any sect since the settlement, even beyond comparison. This seems to be a warning to the Churches of the other denominations.
Page 357 - He was a singular man, of moderate size, short of one leg, with one eye, without any address, with uncommon negligence of person.
Page 456 - As a carver we place Mr. Mclntire with Skilling of Boston. In some works he has succeeded well. He cuts smoother than Skillings but he has not his genius...
Page 356 - This self taught man thirty years ago had the direction of all the music of our Churches. His Reuben, as he whimsically called it, with all its great imperfections, had great fame and he may justly be considered as the father of our new England music. Many who have imitated have excelled him, but none of them had better original powers.
Page 237 - The crowd of spectators forbad me any but a general & superficial view of him. He was six feet four inches high. Of large Volume, his skin black, as tho' lately oiled. A short hair was on every part, but not sufficient for a covering. His tail hung one third of his height, but without any long hairs at the end of it. His legs were still at command at the joints, but he could not be persuaded to lie down. The Keeper repeatedly mounted him but he persisted in shaking him off. Bread & Hay were given...
Page 25 - Do you not think the sufferers innocent?' He (Moody) said 'Yes.' She then added, 'Why may we not suffer also?' The Ministers then told him if he would not carry his wife away they would. " The gentlemen of the town took care to provide at midnight a conveyance, encouraged by the Governor, Gaoler, etc., and Mr.
Page 237 - He tail hung one third of his height, but without any long hairs at the end of it. His legs were still at command at the joints, but he could not be persuaded to lie down. The Keeper repeatedly mounted him but he persisted in shaking him off. Bread & Hay were given him and he took bread out of the pockets of the Spectators. He also drank porter & drew the cork, conveying the liquor from his trunk into his throat.
Page 421 - De La Fayette in the Town of Boston — Report That the President of the Senate & Speaker of the House of Representatives invite the Marquis De La Fayette to meet the two houses of the Legislature in the Senate room on Tuesday the Nineteenth day of October instant at Twelve of the Clock that they may congratulate him on his safe arrival in America after the final establishment of a Peace to which his friendly influence...
Page 200 - ... the farm which included the whole neck between Duck & Crane river, is alienated with its farm house to Col. Sprague of Salem. A third division on the SW is yet retained by the heirs of Endicott. We visited this man who was of the seventh generation from the Gov. At the door we found the Gov.'s dial.t which was in copper, a very fair impression, & in the highest order. It was marked "William Bowyer, London, Clockmaker, fecit. I. 1630. E." (the initials of the Gov.'s name). On the gnomon on one...

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