Annual Register, Volume 10

Front Cover
1800 - History
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Page 241 - How sleep the brave, who sink to rest, By all their country's wishes blest ! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod. By fairy hands their knell is rung ; By forms unseen their dirge is sung : There Honour comes, a pilgrim gray, To bless the turf that wraps their clay ; And Freedom shall awhile repair, To dwell a weeping hermit there ! TO MERCY.
Page 286 - ... spot of it, for rest, for shade, or the like, acquired for the time a sort of ownership, from which it would have been unjust, and contrary to the law of nature, to have driven him by force ; but the instant that he quitted the use or occupation of it, another might seize it without injustice.
Page 308 - If we are asked therefore, where the state of nature is to be found? we may answer, it is here; and it matters not whether we are understood to speak in the island of Great Britain, at the Cape of Good Hope, or the Straits of Magellan.
Page 288 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me; if thou wilt take the left hand, then \ will go to the right; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Page 285 - THERE is nothing which so generally strikes the imagination, and engages the affections of mankind, as the right of . property ; or that sole and despotic dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world} in total exclusion of the right of any other individual in the universe.
Page 219 - ¡rinds, tenements, hereditaments, penfions, offices, and perfonal eftates, in that part of Great - Britain, called England, Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed ; and that a proportionable cefs, according to the ninth article of the treaty of union, be laid upon that part of Great-Britain called Scotland, 1,500,000!.
Page 289 - It was clear that the earth would not produce her fruits in sufficient quantities without the assistance of tillage ; but who would be at the pains of tilling it, if another might watch an opportunity to seize upon and enjoy the product of his industry, art, and labour...
Page 307 - If there was a time in which he had his acquaintance with his own species to make, and his faculties to acquire, it is a time of which we have no record, and in relation to which our opinions can serve no purpose, and are supported by no evidence.
Page 286 - The earth therefore and all things therein are the general property of all mankind, exclusive of other beings, from the Immediate gift of the Creator. And while the earth continued bare of inhabitants it is reasonable to suppose that all was in common among them, and that every one took from the public stock to his own use such things as his immediate necessities required.
Page 287 - ... his garment, the next stranger who came by would have a right to inhabit the one, and to wear the other.

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