Sir John Eliot: A Biography. 1592-1632, Volume 2

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Chapman and Hall, 1872 - Great Britain - 930 pages
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Page 49 - the premises, shall not be drawn hereafter into consequence or example. And that your majesty would be pleased graciously, for the further comfort and safety of your people, to declare your royal will and pleasure that in the things aforesaid, all your officers and ministers
Page 77 - that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm; that the statutes be put in due execution; and that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions contrary to their just rights and liberties; to the preservation whereof he holds himself in conscience as well obliged as of his own prerogative.
Page 246 - Whosoever shall advise the levying of the subsidies of tonnage and poundage not being granted by parliament, or shall be an actor or instrument therein, shall be likewise reputed an innovator in the government, and a capital enemy to the kingdom and commonwealth.
Page 54 - We humbly present this Petition to your majesty, ' not only with a care of preserving our own liberties, but with ' due regard to leave entire that sovereign power wherewith your ' majesty is intrusted, for the protection, safety, and happiness ' of your people.
Page 49 - most humbly pray of your most excellent majesty as their rights and liberties, according to the laws and statutes of this realm. And that your majesty would also vouchsafe to declare, that the awards, doings, and proceedings to the prejudice of your people in any
Page 166 - that is not willing to sacrifice his life for the honour of ' his God, his king, and his country. Let no man commend me ' for doing of it, but rather discommend themselves as the cause ' of it, for if God had not taken away our hearts for our sins he ' would not have gone so long unpunished.
Page 246 - the vast majority replied again. ' If any merchant or other person whatsoever shall voluntarily yield or pay the said subsidies not being granted by parliament, he shall likewise be reputed a betrayer of the liberty of England, and an enemy to the same.
Page 96 - passions as the like had seldom been seen in such an assembly; ' some weeping, some expostulating, some prophesying of the fatal ' ruin of our kingdom; some finding as it were fault with those that ' wept. ... I have been told by a parliament man, that there were ' above an hundred weeping eyes;
Page 28 - every freeman that he hath a full and absolute property in his goods and estate; and that no tax, tallage, loan, benevolence, or other like charge, ought to be levied by the king or his ministers without common consent by act of parliament. These resolutions,
Page 77 - have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions contrary to their just rights and liberties; to the preservation whereof he holds himself in conscience as well obliged as of his own prerogative.

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