The History of Virginia: In Four Parts

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J. W. Randolph, 1855 - HISTORY - 264 pages
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Beverley's history begins with Sir Walter Raleigh and the ill-fated Roanoke Colony (which was then in Virginia, but is now modern-day North Carolina). Chapter II outlines the history of the Virginia Company of London and the Jamestown settlement. He paints a portrait of early Virginia, from the fish and hunted game to the type of soil and indigenous plants. He also writes extensively of the Native American tribes in Virginia and their history as it related to the Jamestown settlement.
 

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Contents

The massacre by the Indians anno 1622
16
That colonys mismanagement
17
Their ways of dining CHAPTER V
18
19 Manner of their traveling and provision they make for it Their way of concealing their course
19
Manner of their reception of strangers The pipe of peace
20
Their entertainment of honorable friends CHAPTER VI
21
22 That they are without letters Their descriptions by hieroglyphics Heraldry and arms of the Indians
22
That they have different languages
23
Their general language CHAPTER VII
24
Sir Thomas Gates arrives governor
25
Descent of the crown
26
29 Their quioccassan and idol of worship
29
Their notions of God and worshiping the evil spirit
30
Pocahontas reception at court and death
31
Their huskanawing
32
Reasons of this custom
33
Their offerings and sacrifice
34
Their set feasts
35
Their account of time
36
An account of those French
37
The discouraging effects of the massacre
38
Places of their worship and sacrifice
39
Their care of the bodies of their princes after death
40
A salt work and iron work in Virginia
43
Their treaties of peace and ceremonies upon conclusion of peace 151
45
The discovery and prevention of it at Jamestown
47
History of the government from the dissolution of the company to
53
Governor Harvey sent prisoner to England and by the king
59
91
60
Virginia subdued by the protector Cromwell
65
102
66
Sir William Berkeley makes Colonel Morrison deputy governor
71
123
75
Indian affairs settled by law
77
A plot to subvert the government
80
139
81
140
82
142
83
145
84

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Page 31 - England; the first Christian ever of that Nation, the first Virginian ever spake English, or had a child in marriage by an Englishman: a matter surely, if my meaning be truly considered and well understood, worthy a Prince's understanding.
Page 110 - ... and another stark naked was sitting up in a corner, like a monkey, grinning and making mows at them...
Page 239 - Indeed, some few hides, with much ado, are tanned and made into servants' shoes; but at so careless a rate, that the planters don't care to buy them if they can get others; and sometimes, perhaps, a better manager than ordinary will vouchsafe to make a pair of breeches of a deer-skin.
Page 29 - That some ten years ago being in Virginia, and taken prisoner by the power of Powhatan their chief King, I received from this great Savage...
Page 31 - Jamestown, with her wild train, she as freely frequented as her father's habitation; and, during the time of two or three years, she, next, under God, was still the instrument to preserve this colony from death, famine, and utter confusion, which if in those times had once been dissolved, Virginia might have lain as it was at our first arrival to this day.
Page 231 - Child, that this as well as all the rest of the plantations, was for the most part at first peopled by persons of low circumstances, and by such as were willing to seek their fortunes in a foreign country. Nor was it hardly possible it should be otherwise ; for 'tis not likely that any man of a plentiful estate should voluntarily abandon a happy certainty, to roam after imaginary advantages, in a new world.
Page 158 - ... and a rattle in his hand. With most strange gestures and passions he began his invocation, and environed the fire with a circle of meale...
Page 151 - King stood in the middest guarded, as before is said, and after three dances they all departed. Smith they conducted to a long house, where...
Page 185 - ... arrival of the Europeans, by whose means they seem to have lost their Felicity, as well as their Innocence. The English have taken away great part of their Country, and consequently made every thing less plenty amongst them. They have introduc'd Drunkenness and Luxury amongst them, which have multiply'd their Wants, and put them upon desiring a thousand things, they never dreamt of before.
Page 113 - ... the Meat of a Carnation, and the Seed black, and shining, while it lies in the Melon. 3. Their Pompions I need not describe, but must say they are much larger and finer than any I ever heard of in England. 4. Their Cushaws are a kind of Pompion, of a bluish green Colour streaked with White, when they are fit for Use. They are larger than the Pompions, and have a long narrow Neck: Perhaps this may be the Ecushaw of T.

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