The Satanic Verses: A Novel

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Macmillan, 2000 - Fiction - 561 pages
59 Reviews

A gripping account of the 1918 flu pandemic and the modern-day hunt for this elusive and deadly virus

In 1918, a flu virus more lethal than any that has come along since swept through the world, from the remotest villages in Arctic climates to crowded U.S.cities to the battlefields of Europe, killing forty million people. Yet, despite its devastating toll and the probability that other deadly pandemics await on the horizon, it was relegated to a footnote in history.The Devil's Flu is the extraordinary story of 1918's forgotten tragedy and of the global scientific community's effort to avert another such disaster.

The 1918 flu still so intrigues and frightens experts in the field that in 1998, a group of respected scientists journeyed to the Norwegian Arctic Circle in search of the mysterious killer. InThe Devil's Flu, Davies captures the excitement of the hunt and the intense rivalries within the scientific community, and paints a vivid portrait of the eccentric scientists bent on capturing the prize information that could hold the key to our future safety. And as far as the next pandemic is concerned, scientists agree: it's not a question of if, but when.

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User Review  - bness2 - LibraryThing

I think this book is famous more because of its infamy than its quality. I am impressed with the author's obvious knowledge of pop and literary culture, evident from the numerous allusions and details ... Read full review

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User Review  - amerynth - LibraryThing

Salman Rushdie has an amazing gift for language... and "The Satanic Verses" really doesn't disappoint. He writes the kind of sentences you just want to linger over -- they are clever without being ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Salman Rushdie is the author of six novels: Grimus, Midnight's Children, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, and one work of short stories titled East, West. He has also published four works of nonfiction: The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary Homelands, The Wizard of Oz, and Mirrorwork (co-edited with Elizabeth West).

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