History of the Mogul Dynasty in India: From Its Foundation by Tamerlane, in the Year 1399, to the Accession of Aurengzebe, in the Year 1657

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J.M. Richardson, 1826 - India - 324 pages
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Page 132 - ... venom of the poison of the caterpillar. He commanded one of the officers of his suite to get it conveyed to his palace. It was on this occasion that the emperor created the office of poisoner, an office till then unknown to the Mogul government. By the instrumentality of this new officer, Akbar quietly disposed of the nobles and the rajas whom he believed to be concerned in the conspiracy of Mostafa. Poisoned pills were compounded for him, which he obliged them to take in his presence. The poison...
Page 131 - Emperor recognised, from this circumstance, the extreme venom of the poison of the caterpillar. He commanded one of the officers of his suite to get it conveyed to his palace. It was on this occasion that the Emperor created the office of poisoner, an office till then unknown to the Mogul government. By the instrumentality of this new officer, Akbar quietly disposed of the nobles and the Rajas whom he believed to be concerned in the conspiracy of Mostafa.
Page 156 - Akbar, had been tolerated in the capital. The Emperor took a seat near an artisan, who was drinking with great gaiety, and, inspired with the wine, was disposed to indulge his vocal talents. Jehan Guir was delighted to find himself in such pleasant society. A familiarity was soon established between them, and the artisan was particularly charmed with the liberality of the new guest, who paid the entire score, and made him drink deep. In their conversation, they treated of the affairs of government;...
Page 178 - ... to solicit, that his body might be buried in the sepulchre of his father. Sultan Bolaqui, the grandson- of the late Emperor, had seized the throne on the death of Jehan Guir. When he was informed that his uncle, the rival claimant, was no more, he gave his consent gladly, that all the honours of interment should be paid to a prince of his blood, from whom death, as he believed, had delivered him so opportunely. A convoy was, therefore, prepared, attended with all the magnificence due to a prince...
Page 131 - ... balcony to be worshipped as a god by the people, who knelt before him, and presented their petitions to him ; which it was spread abroad were miraculously heard, if not miraculously granted. Akbar, like his father and his grandfather, perished by an accident of singular infelicity. One day, when he was hunting, in the environs of Agra, he lost sight of his attendants, and being much fatigued, set himself down at the foot of a tree, which afforded a welcome shade. Whilst he was trying to compose...
Page 131 - ... Indies. He pierced it through with an arrow, which he drew from his quiver. A little time afterwards, an antelope made its appearance within bow-shot. The Emperor took aim at it with the same arrow with which he had pierced the caterpillar. Notwithstanding the antelope received the shaft in a part of its body which was not susceptible of a mortal wound, the animal instantaneously expired. The hunters of the Prince, who opened the beast, found the flesh black and corrupted, and all the dogs who...
Page 286 - Whilst the princes remain in the harem, under the eye of their father, a eunuch is charged with their education. They are taught to read and sometimes to write in Arabic and in Persian. Their bodies are formed to military exercises, and they are instructed in the principles of equity. They are taught to decide rationally upon subjects of dispute which occur, or on suppositious suits at law.
Page 156 - Wine-houses, since the days of Akbar, had been tolerated in the capital. The Emperor took a seat near an artisan, who was drinking with great gaiety, and, inspired with the wine, was disposed to indulge his vocal talents. Jahangir was delighted to find himself in such pleasant society. A familiarity was soon established between them, and the artisan was particularly charmed with the liberality of the new guest, who paid the entire score, and made him drink deep.
Page 205 - ... Portuguese, in the event of a change of fortune. The Persian who found himself supported no longer placed any limits to his peculations. He plundered the temples of their idols ; he seized upon all precious stones with which the statues were ornamented ; he compelled the inhabitants of the Karnatic to surrender to him whatever they possessed of gold and jewels ; and he caused those who, according to the custom of the country, had buried their treasures, to expire under the severity...
Page 158 - The King, who heard the poor weaver's exclamation, laughed most heartily. He tasted the good man's wine; and bestowed upon him employments at court sufficiently considerable to enable him to dispense with following any longer his profession. The latter days of Jehan Guir were embittered by the civil wars which his rebellious children excited in their contentions for the right of succession. Jehan Guir had himself rebelled against his father Akbar, and, as a judgment on his unnatural crime, he now...

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