Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 18

Front Cover
Sir Leslie Stephen
Macmillan, 1889 - Great Britain
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Page 195 - ... a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it. Gravity must be caused by an agent acting constantly according to certain laws ; but whether this agent be material or immaterial, I have left to the consideration of my readers.
Page 195 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it.
Page 60 - ... of the Royal Society, of which he was elected a fellow in 1741.
Page 424 - Familiar Letters between the Principal Characters in David Simple, and Some others.
Page 276 - The Dippers dipt : or, the Anabaptists duck'd and plung'd over head and eares at a Disputation in Southwark.
Page 359 - Tree and Serpent Worship ; Or, Illustrations of Mythology and Art in India in the First and Fourth Centuries after Christ, from the Sculptures of the Buddhist Topes at Sanchi and Amravati.
Page 372 - The Blazon of Gentrie : Deuided into two parts. The first named The Glorie of Generositie. The second, Lacyes Nobilitie. Comprehending discourses of Armes and of Gentry. Wherein is treated of the beginning, parts, and degrees of Gentlenesse, with her lawes : Of the Bearing, and Blazon of Cote-Armors : Of the Lawes of Armes, and of Combats. Compiled by lohn Ferne, Gentleman, for the instruction of all Gentlemen bearers of Armes, whome and none other this Worke concerneth.
Page 106 - Tome, without Inscription, the Body of Peter Fabell (as the report goes) upon whom this Fable was fathered, that he by his wittie devises beguiled the devill : belike he was some ingenious conceited gentleman, who did use some sleighty trickes for his owne disports. He lived and died in the raigne of Henry the Seventh, saith the booke of his merry pranks.
Page 194 - In our conceptions and reasonings regarding the forces of nature, we perpetually make use of symbols which, when they possess a high representative value, we dignify with the name of theories. Thus prompted by certain analogies, we ascribe electrical phenomena to the action of a peculiar fluid, sometimes flowing, sometimes at rest. Such conceptions have their advantages and their disadvantages; they afford peaceful lodging to the intellect for a time, but they also circumscribe it, and...
Page 359 - Handbook of Architecture. Being a Concise and Popular Account of the Different Styles prevailing in all Ages and Countries in the World. With a Description of the most remarkable Buildings.

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